Apple lets movies into iCloud, upgrades Apple TV

Mar 07, 2012

(AP) -- Apple is going to start letting users store movies on its iCloud remote storage service, allowing them to access their movies from PCs, iPhones and other Apple devices through the Internet.

The company is also upgrading its set-top box so that it can play movies in "1080p" format, the highest-resolution commonly used video standard.

The small box, which comes with a remote, will still cost $99. The upgraded version will go on sale next week.

The announcements were among the first at an Apple event in San Francisco on Wednesday, where CEO Tim Cook is expected to reveal a new iPad model.

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