Stock market stereotypes undervalue female directors in the short-term

Feb 24, 2012
Stock market stereotypes undervalue female directors in the short-term

(PhysOrg.com) -- New research into how the stock market perceives the capabilities of female company directors finds that an initial negative response by investors is overturned in the longer term, once markets respond to corporate performance rather than stereotypes.

The study analysed the response to male and ’ purchases of their own company shares, examining both the short-run and long-run stock market reaction response to directors’ trades.

Results suggest that the price reaction to male directors’ share activity is initially faster and larger than that for female directors, showing that the short-term market reaction retains a gender bias reflecting the prevalence of negative ; where the market reacts to beliefs rather than performance.

Researchers at the Universities of Bath and Exeter found that in the first 20 days after a director’s trade, stock prices rise by 1.57 per cent in the case of a male director’s purchase of shares, but by only 0.88 per cent following a female director’s purchase.

However in the longer term there is no difference in the stock market reaction to male and female directors’ trades. By twelve months after the initial trade, the stock market has risen by an average of 0.33 per cent per month following a male director’s purchase; but rises by an average of 0.44 per cent per month after a female director’s purchase (although these gender differences are not statistically significant).

Ian Tonks, Professor of Finance at the University of Bath’s School of Management, said: “Differences between the short and long-run responses provide an insight into whether there is evidence to suggest that females are systematically initially undervalued by the stock market with reference to their senior position in the organisation.

“Critically, examining both long-term and short-term market reaction allows us to compare short-run perceptions of how informed female directors are thought to be, with longer horizon returns that provide us with an indication of how the market may have re-evaluated such initial perceptions when more information on performance became available.”

Alan Gregory, Professor of Corporate Finance at the University of Exeter said: “Directors’ trades form an interesting test of stock market reaction to gender differences in corporations. This issue has previously been analysed using data relating to directors’ appointments, but trades by female directors occur far more frequently than female board appointments, allowing for more powerful tests of gender differences.

“Our results from this study have interesting implications for those researchers who have found markets react less favourably to the appointment of female directors than male directors, as we provide evidence that shows markets initially under-react to information in female directors’ trades. It seems perfectly possible that markets may similarly under-react to news about the appointment of female directors.”

The researchers also believe their study, published in the British Journal of Management, is relevant for policy makers assessing the value of having females on corporate boards, as they deliberate over policy options for increasing the representation of women.

The study used a dataset of more than 80,000 directors’ trades in FTSE All Share and AIM-listed companies from 1994 to 2006.

Explore further: Organising is the key to efficient purchasing

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Female directors help to boost earnings quality

Aug 04, 2011

Prof. Judy Tsui, PolyU’s Vice President (International and Executive Education), Director of the Graduate School of Business and Chair Professor of Accounting, Prof. Ferdinand A. Gul, Chair Professor of Accounting and ...

Insider trading: Another glass ceiling?

Oct 08, 2008

(PhysOrg.com) -- Martha Stewart notwithstanding, female executives who legally trade on inside information make nice, tidy profits—but not as much as men in the same positions, say researchers at the University of Michigan's ...

Female directors boost green reporting performance

Aug 31, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- Companies with women on their boards of directors have a better record of corporate transparency in the area of environmental disclosure, according to a study by researchers in the Flinders University Business ...

Recommended for you

Organising is the key to efficient purchasing

18 hours ago

A well-functioning purchasing organisation is a powerful tool for companies. Chalmers researcher Ingrid Hessel shows in her thesis that internal purchasing operations affects and is affected by relationships ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

JES
1 / 5 (1) Feb 24, 2012
Good, another shiny example that the efficient market hypothesis is utterly flawed. This is a much support for behavioural finance as it gets!
AWaB
1 / 5 (1) Feb 24, 2012
Behavioral finance? Follow the random walk and you'll be the least disappointed. Otherwise, you're just wasting your time and money.