Computing professor sparks gamers' creativity at world renowned conference

Feb 17, 2012

Gamers don't just play Nicholas Graham's new video game, Liberi Live – they design it. While one player is rolling and bouncing a ball over obstacles and collecting coins another player can control the course design. The two interact together and with a touch of a button, obstacles or ramps can be added to completely change the game.

"Gaming has reached a bit of a cul de sac. There are first-person shooters, strategy and role-playing games, but it's been ages since a new type of game came out and that's what we're aiming for – creating a game where the players can change the game itself," says Dr. Graham, a professor in the School of Computing who also runs the EQUIS Lab which deals with video game development. "Somebody engaging in the design of the game at the same time as somebody is playing it, allows everyone far more creativity."

Dr. Graham's video game will be on display at one of the world's top conferences in human-computer interaction, TEI 2012 (Tangible, Embedded and Embodied Interaction), taking place at Queen's University next week.

Some of the other technology on display at the conference includes a two-sided flexible TV screen that can be folded like paper; socially networked yoga mats; a glove for deaf-blind people that translates the hand-touch alphabet Lorm (a common form of communication used by deaf-blind people) into text; and a wearable system of sensors designed to improve posture among office workers by rewarding regular body movement with access to a during the workday.

The conference is organized by the Queen's Human Media Lab. "One of the missions of the Queen's Human Media Lab is to develop the high tech sector for Canada and Queen's. To have all the top researchers from around the world come to Kingston shows we are on the right track," says School of Computing professor Roel Vertegaal, who runs the Human at Queen's.

Explore further: Thanksgiving travel woes? There's an app for that

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

UQ study confirms dangers of violent video games

Oct 31, 2011

(Medical Xpress) -- New research by Dr. Brock Bastian from UQ's School of Psychology has found evidence that playing violent video games leads players to see themselves, and their opponents, as lacking in core human qualities ...

Leveling the gaming field

May 13, 2008

A new computer game developed by MIT and Singaporean students makes it possible for visually impaired people to play the game on a level field with their sighted friends.

Pico projector used in eye based video gaming system

May 03, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- Students at the University of Texas in Austen are playing video games. Honestly, that is really not news. Students all over the country are playing video games, usually when they should be studying. In this ...

Recommended for you

Audi to develop Tesla Model S all-electric rival

14 hours ago

The Tesla Model S has a rival. Audi is to develop all-electric family car. This is to be a family car that will offer an all-electric range of 280 miles (450 kilometers), according to Auto Express, which ...

A green data center with an autonomous power supply

19 hours ago

A new data center in the United States is generating electricity for its servers entirely from renewable sources, converting biogas from a sewage treatment plant into electricity and water. Siemens implemented ...

After a data breach, it's consumers left holding the bag

20 hours ago

Shoppers have launched into the holiday buying season and retailers are looking forward to year-end sales that make up almost 20% of their annual receipts. But as you check out at a store or click "purchase" on your online shopping cart ...

Can we create an energy efficient Internet?

20 hours ago

With the number of Internet connected devices rapidly increasing, researchers from Melbourne are starting a new research program to reduce energy consumption of such devices.

Brain inspired data engineering

21 hours ago

What if next-generation ICT systems could be based on the brain's structure and its cognitive and adaptive processes? A groundbreaking paradigm of brain-inspired intelligent ICT architectures is being born.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.