Under the Microscope #10 - Mouse tail skin

February 22, 2012

The epidermis, which is the outer layer of mammalian skin, is maintained by numerous stem cell populations.

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Claire Cox: “The identification of the factors involved in controlling these populations and thus epidermal maintenance is highly valuable. Not only will it provide information as to how a complex tissue is organized and controlled, the principles that are learnt can be applied to other tissues. Through the work that I am completing, I hope that I can also gain a perspective as to what goes wrong in disease processes such as skin cancer. cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in the world, and understanding what goes wrong and the factors involved could potentially lead to new ideas as to prevention and treatment.”

The image is 700µm in width – this is about the size of the full stop in this sentence. About 5000 cells would fit on the surface of a full stop.

Under the Microscope is a collection of videos that show glimpses of the natural and man-made world in stunning close-up. They are released every Monday and Thursday and you can see them here: bit.ly/A6bwCE

Explore further: Under the microscope #9 - skate head

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