Japan firms plan wind farm near Fukushima: report

Feb 14, 2012
An offshore wind farm is pictured off the northern German Island of Borkum in 2010. A group of Japanese firms led by trading house Marubeni Corp. plans to build a large floating experimental wind farm off the coast of Fukushima prefecture, which was hit by a nuclear disaster last year, a report said Tuesday.

A group of Japanese firms led by trading house Marubeni Corp. plans to build a large floating experimental wind farm off the coast of Fukushima prefecture, which was hit by a nuclear disaster last year, a report said Tuesday.

The project aims to generate around 12,000 kilowatts of power, which would supply the needs of more than 100,000 households, and is hoped to go into operation by 2016, Jiji Press news agency reported, quoting Marubeni officials.

Marubeni plans to begin the experiment by the end of March, supported by Japan's industry ministry with financing from a supplementary budget for reconstruction following the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami which triggered the disaster at the Fukushima Daiichi .

Ltd, Nippon Steel Corp and Mitsui Engineering & Shipbuilding Co are in the consortium along with Marubeni, Jiji said, adding that an official announcement was expected in the following week.

The energy-hungry nation has virtually no natural resources of its own and relied on atomic power for around a third of its electricity before March 11.

Since the disaster the vast bulk of nuclear plants have been shut down as local authorities blocked their being restarted following routine safety checks or maintenance, forcing the country to seek alternatives, in particular renewable sources of energy.

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Howhot
not rated yet Feb 14, 2012
You know, that's an interesting use for a contaminated land. Don't let it waste away as a background radiation gray soup zone. Put wind farms on the now-cheap contaminated land (or sea) and make some money. The land being un-inhabitable for long period stays, why not? Heck, solar panels could be another long term energy providing system need little human maintenance and some of the infrastructure may still be in place.

CapitalismPrevails
1 / 5 (3) Feb 14, 2012
I don't think Japan gets a lot of sunny weather so i solar panels wouldn't be the best idea.
dan42day
1 / 5 (3) Feb 15, 2012
I know these windpower folks tend to be a bit optimistic, but 12,000 kilowatts will supply 100,000 households? Really? Each house only has two 60 watt lightbulbs? What if someone turns on a hair dryer?

Seriously though, I am concerned about the devastation that would occur if a hurricane came along and blew all those spinning blades off their axles. They could travel miles inland chopping up everything in their paths. God knows, they've been through enough.
antialias_physorg
3 / 5 (2) Feb 15, 2012
I don't think Japan gets a lot of sunny weather so i solar panels wouldn't be the best idea.

Japan gets about as much as Europe - so putting up solar panels in places there is perfectly fine.
Off shore wind (and especially wave) energy are a really good way to get energy there, as Japan has plenty of coasts.

What if someone turns on a hair dryer?

that's average. You don't use a hair dryer (or other large energy consumers) all day long but only for a very short times, so they only figure very marginally in your average usage.

They could travel miles inland chopping up everything in their paths

I think you need to stop wtaching Hollywood movies. you're starting to confuse them with the news.
dan42day
1 / 5 (1) Feb 17, 2012
that's average


You are missing the point. 120 watts per household is not "average", usually 1200 watts is used in these calculations. They are off by a factor of 10.

I think you need to stop wtaching Hollywood movies. you're starting to confuse them with the news.


I think you need to start taking yourself less seriously, you seem to be confused by my joke.