Man who warned of Challenger disaster dies at 73

Feb 07, 2012

The man who warned his employer of the equipment quirk that led to the deadly explosion of the space shuttle Challenger has died. Roger Boisjoly was 73.

A funeral home in Boisjoly's hometown of Nephi, Utah, confirmed his Jan. 6 death with The Associated Press on Tuesday.

Boisjoly (boh-zhoh-LAY') had written an ominous memo to his supervisors at Morton Thiokol six months before the shuttle launched on Jan. 28, 1986. He told the company that could compromise the seals connecting sections of the they manufactured.

Boisjoly and four other engineers pleaded with supervisors for a delay the night before the launch, as temperatures dipped below freezing.

The warning was ignored, and the shuttle exploded 73 seconds after . Seven crew members, including teacher Christa McAuliffe, were killed.

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Telekinetic
2 / 5 (4) Feb 07, 2012
I remember this engineer at the time of the disaster. He was one of many conscientious people that industries have a policy of ignoring. An engineer in an early repair of the Fukushima reactor that finally failed had told the company that it was still faulty, but they paid him to keep his mouth shut. Then there was the old, retired contractor trying to warn the crane operator that it was unstable. If people knew what dangers lie in wait for them out of corrupt, uncaring, and money grubbing industrial managers, they would never leave the safety of their homes.(which are often filled with out-gassing toxic materials)
jsdarkdestruction
5 / 5 (2) Feb 07, 2012
I have a huge amount of respect for the man and am very sorry to hear of his passing.
Vendicar_Decarian
3 / 5 (4) Feb 07, 2012
And to think that Republican George Bush did his best to punish any whistle blower that challenged his non stop stream of lies.