Copper + love chemical = big sulfur stink

Feb 06, 2012
Research by Duke University and UAlbany has shown that copper ions allow the female mouse to detect sulfur-containing chemicals in the urine of a male mouse suitor. (Graphic by Ann Thomson)

When Hiroaki Matsunami, Ph.D., at Duke set out to study a chemical in male mouse urine called MTMT that attracts female mice, he didn't think he would stumble into a new field of study.

But the research has led scientists at Duke University Medical Center and the University of Albany to the discovery that it's the copper in our bodies that makes mammals recoil from sulfur chemical smells.

Working with Eric Block, Ph.D., the Carla Rizzo Delray Distinguished Professor of Chemistry at the University of Albany, the team looked at reasons why mammals, including people, can detect even trace amounts of sulfur-containing substances, like MTMT.

"While we were doing our experiments, on even very dilute specimens of MTMT, our neighbors on the lab hallway complained," Matsunami said with a laugh. He is an associate professor of and microbiology and of neurobiology at Duke. The Duke laboratory ran a high-throughput test of several hundred mammalian odor receptors, and found that one receptor that bound resulted in superior detection of even trace amounts of sulfur.

Rotten egg smell, skunk spray, and odorized natural gas (for leak detection) are examples of sulfur-containing substances.

The work was published in the online the week of Feb. 6.

"We learned that copper was the metal that allowed for detection of all the sulfur-containing compounds we tested, and it was Eric Block's idea that metal ions must be involved," Matsunami said. "I see no reason why the mouse receptor activity would be different from human receptors, because we have the same kind of ."

Block and colleagues created several dozen sulfur-containing compounds for testing.

The odor impact of the sulfur-containing molecule MTMT can be attenuated by manipulating the copper concentration in the nasal mucus. The team also did experiments using a chemical that binds to copper in the mouse nose, so that copper wasn't available to the receptors, and the mice didn't detect the MTMT, Matsunami said.

"This study establishes for the first time the key role of a metal, namely copper, in the activity of an olfactory receptor," Eric Block said. "What's also exciting is that, because olfactory receptors are transmembrane G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) of the same type as receptors for drugs, our discovery suggests a possibility that some drug receptor responses may also be enhanced in the presence of copper or other ."

Explore further: A new synthetic amino acid for an emerging class of drugs

Related Stories

Why King Kong failed to impress

Dec 08, 2009

Humans have the same receptors for detecting odors related to sex as do other apes and primates. But each species uses them in different ways, stemming from the way the genes for these receptors have evolved over time, according ...

Scientists Solve Sour Taste Proteins

Aug 07, 2006

A team led by Duke University Medical Center researchers has discovered two proteins in the taste buds on the surface of the tongue that are responsible for detecting sour tastes.

Recommended for you

A new synthetic amino acid for an emerging class of drugs

21 hours ago

Swiss scientists have developed a new amino acid that can be used to modify the 3-D structure of therapeutic peptides. Insertion of the amino acid into bioactive peptides enhanced their binding affinity up to 40-fold. Peptides ...

Protein glue shows potential for use with biomaterials

Aug 28, 2014

Researchers at the University of Milan in Italy have shown that a synthetic protein called AGMA1 has the potential to promote the adhesion of brain cells in a laboratory setting. This could prove helpful ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Argiod
Feb 06, 2012
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
tadchem
not rated yet Feb 07, 2012
MTMT = (methylthio)methanethiol