Chilling climate-change related news

February 17, 2012

A presentation at the world’s largest science fair by a Simon Fraser University earth sciences professor promises to make the skin crawl of even the most ardent disbelievers of the predicted impacts of climate change.

John Clague will explain the impact of climate change on historical sea level changes off the Pacific Northwest in his talk Impacts of Rising Seas on the British Columbia Coast in the 21st Century.

Clague is delivering his talk during Causes and Effects of Relative Sea-Level Changes in the Northeast Pacific, a seminar at the 2012 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) conference. It’s at the Vancouver Convention Centre. Clague’s talk is on Sunday, Feb. 19.

Clague will draw on his and other studies to explain why “no low-lying coastline in the Pacific Northwest will be unaffected by an expected climate-change driven five-metre rise in coastal sea levels globally.”

“Flooding and erosion may be exacerbated by changes in storminess in the warmer climate that is anticipated later in the century,” says Clague. The Royal Society of Canada member has more than 500 peer-reviewed research papers to his credit.

“Unfortunately, sections of the coast of northwest North America that are most vulnerable to flooding and erosion are those that support the largest human populations and infrastructure.

“Specifically, they are the southern and central Strait of Georgia, Juan de Fuca Strait and the Pacific coast of Washington. In contrast, sparsely populated, steep rocky shorelines that constitute most of the British Columbia coast will be much less affected.”

Clague will explain how warming ocean water and melting glaciers are combining with to create the perfect storm in terms of flooding and erosion that threaten life and property.

Explore further: Washington state sea levels could rise considerably by end of century

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Feb 17, 2012
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2 / 5 (8) Feb 20, 2012
Until 2007 Sea level has been rising at the rate 6 inches per year ant the rate has been declining. Since 2007 sea level has been dropping.
http://www.nation...s/oceans aren about swallow/4644433/story.html

In 2005, the United Nations Environment Programme predicted that climate change would create 50 million climate refugees by 2010.

The following site shows rainfall and sea level changes in the Pacific Northwest for the last 100 years as compiled by HADCRU and NOAA. Most stations show no unprecedented long-term warming trends. Many show a temperature decline since 1900. The UK PSML dataset shows sea level has steadily dropped 6 inches since 1900.

How much are George Soros, Al Gore, the WWF and Socialists paying professor Fraser to raise false alarms? Does his research funding depe
4 / 5 (4) Feb 21, 2012
Filty, Stupid Conservative Troll.

"Until 2007 Sea level has been rising at the rate 6 inches per year ant the rate has been declining." - XQZME


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