Dinosaurs had fleas too -- giant ones, fossils show

Feb 29, 2012 By SETH BORENSTEIN , AP Science Writer
This undated handout photo provided by Nature shows a female, left, and male, right, fleas from the Middle Jurassic. In the Jurassic era, even the measly flea was a beast. It was a super-sized bloodsucker that feasted on dinosaurs with a saw-lie siphon. (AP Photo/D. Huang, Nature)

In the Jurassic era, even the flea was a beast, compared to its minuscule modern descendants. These pesky bloodsuckers were nearly an inch long.

New fossils found in China are evidence of the oldest fleas - from 125 million to 165 million years ago, said Diying Huang of the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Paleontology. Their disproportionately long proboscis, or straw-like mouth, had sharp weapon-like serrated edges that helped them bite and feed from their super-sized hosts, he and other researchers reported Wednesday in the journal Nature.

Scientists figure about eight or more of today's fleas would fit on the burly back of their ancient ancestor.

"That's a beast," said study co-author Michael Engel, entomology curator at the Natural History Museum at the University of Kansas. "It was a big critter. I can't even imagine coming home and finding my miniature schnauzer with one or more of these things crawling around on it."

The ancient female fleas were close to twice the size of the males, researchers found, which fits with modern fleas.

But Engel said it's not just the size that was impressive about the nine flea fossils. It was their fearsome beak capable of sticking into and sucking blood from the hides of certain dinosaurs, probably those that had feathers.

These flea beaks "had almost like a saw running down the side," Engel said. "This thing was packing a weapon. They were equipped to dig into something."

While the ancient fleas were big, they had one disadvantage compared to modern ones: Their legs weren't too developed. Evolving over time, fleas went from crawling to jumping, Huang said.

"Luckily for the land animals of the Mesozoic, these big flat fleas lacked the tremendous jumping capacity that our common fleas have," said Joe Hannibal of the Cleveland Museum of Natural History. He wasn't involved in the study, but praised it as useful and interesting.

Just finding the fleas was a stroke of luck, Huang said. He first found one in a Chinese fossil market and mentioned it to someone at his hotel. The other guest showed him a photo of another fossilized flea, telling him it was from Daohugou in northeastern China, where there's a famous fossil bed from about 165 million years ago. Huang went there and found fleas preserved in a brownish film of volcanic ash. The grains of rock were so fine you could see antennae and other details of the fleas, he said.

Modern fleas get engorged after they feast on blood, but these didn't seem engorged, Engel said.

It shouldn't seem too surprising that there were large fleas more than 100 million years ago. If you go back even farther in time, ancestors of dragonflies and damsel flies had 3-foot wingspans, Engel said.

Explore further: Ancient clay seals may shed light on biblical era

More information: Nature: http://www.nature.com/nature, DOI: 10.1038/nature10839

Journal reference: Nature search and more info website

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User comments : 8

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LariAnn
4.3 / 5 (6) Feb 29, 2012
If Huang first found one of these at a fossil market, it must have been a "flea market" . . .
mleehayes
not rated yet Feb 29, 2012
Is it just me, or is there no mention of the actual size??? How big is a big flea?
panorama
not rated yet Feb 29, 2012
In the Jurassic era, even the flea was a beast, compared to its minuscule modern descendants. These pesky bloodsuckers were nearly an inch long.


Just under the photo, an inch long flea would be scary as sh*t.
deatopmg
1 / 5 (3) Feb 29, 2012
can you imagine how far those suckers could jump!
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (1) Feb 29, 2012
In the Jurassic era, even the flea was a beast, compared to its minuscule modern descendants. These pesky bloodsuckers were nearly an inch long.


Just under the photo, an inch long flea would be scary as sh*t.
Oh they got much bigger than this...
http://www.youtub...rLxZKDkg
http://cloverfiel...Parasite

Parsec
5 / 5 (2) Mar 01, 2012
can you imagine how far those suckers could jump!

The article mentioned that they didn't have jumping legs.
Ojorf
3 / 5 (2) Mar 01, 2012
can you imagine how far those suckers could jump!


"Their legs weren't too developed. Evolving over time, fleas went from crawling to jumping"
visual
not rated yet Mar 02, 2012
I wonder if they could find readable dyno DNA inside one of them and bring around Jurassic Park for real.
I also wonder if they could mix it up with super-flea DNA by mistake and bring around dyno-flea hybrids for real :p

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