Bail rules prevent Kim Dotcom from using Internet

Feb 23, 2012 By NICK PERRY , Associated Press
Kim Dotcom, the founder of the file-sharing website Megaupload, walks past media after he was granted bail and released on Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2012, in Auckland, New Zealand. Kim was granted bail and released on Wednesday after a New Zealand judge determined that authorities have seized any funds he might have used to flee the country. (AP Photo/New Zealand Herald, Sarah Ivey)

(AP) -- Megaupload founder Kim Dotcom made his fortune and even took his name from the Internet, but now he's barred from logging on.

Dotcom, accused by U.S. authorities of facilitating millions of illegal downloads through the file-sharing website, has been ordered not to access the Internet as part of his bail conditions. Another unusual condition: No helicopters can land at his home.

was arrested in New Zealand in a high-profile raid Jan. 20 and was released Wednesday. New Zealand court authorities disclosed his bail conditions Thursday after The Associated Press and other media requested the information.

Under the terms of his release, Dotcom may leave his Auckland home only for approved outings such as court appearances and medical appointments. He is banned from contacting three colleagues who were also arrested during the New Zealand raid and have also been released on bail pending extradition proceedings.

U.S. authorities have charged Dotcom with racketeering. They say he and his colleagues cheated movie makers and out of half a in copyright revenue while making a fortune for themselves.

Dotcom did not have to post any monetary bond for his bail, a standard policy for New Zealand's district courts. He has an extradition hearing scheduled for August.

Dotcom was born Kim Schmitz in Germany but legally changed his name.

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