Sony's next-generation 55-inch 'Crystal LED Display' prototype presented at CES

Jan 11, 2012
Sony's next-generation 55-inch 'Crystal LED Display' prototype presented at CES
'Crystal LED Display' Full HD 55-inch Prototype

Sony announced that it has developed the next-generation self-emitting display, “Crystal LED Display,” and presents a Full HD, 55-inch prototype model at the 2012 International Consumer Electronics Show. It is the industry's first 55-inch Full HD self-emitting display using LEDs as the light source.

The “Crystal ” is a self-emitting display that uses ’s unique methods to mount ultrafine LEDs in each of the Red-Green-Blue (RGB) colors, equivalent to the number of pixels (approximately six-million LEDs for Full HD). The RGB LED light source is mounted directly on the front of the display, dramatically improving the light use efficiency. This results in images with strikingly higher contrast (in both light and dark environments), wider color gamut, superb video image response time, and wider viewing angles when compared to existing LCD and plasma displays, with low power consumption. Furthermore, due to the display’s structure, the “Crystal LED Display” is also ideal for large screens.

Compared to existing LCD displays, the 55-inch prototype exhibited at CES is boasting approximately 3.5 times higher contrast in light environment, approximately 1.4 times wider color gamut, and approximately 10 times faster video image response time (all values based on current Sony models). Sony envisages a wide range of applications for its “Crystal LED Display”, ranging from professional to consumer use. Sony will work to bring the “Crystal LED Display” to market.

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Royale
not rated yet Jan 11, 2012
Nice. Maybe in a few years I won't have to explain to people the differences between LCDs and LED LCDs. Between this and Samsung's OLED, maybe we won't have to worry about backlights at all anymore.
Yogaman
not rated yet Jan 11, 2012
OK, this might be really cool and profitable and inexpensive. However,...

I hope they've solved the lifetime uniformity problem for 6 million LEDs.

Performance improvement is modest: just a factor of 3.5 in contrast plus 10x in response against today's production LCD technology. (The color gamut increase is useless unless you like saturated colors.) And is that 3.5x compared to "Dynamic Contrast" ratios of 5,000,000 to 1? I bet that'd be hard to tell the difference.

In the meantime, LED-LCDs continue to drive down backlight costs.

And OLEDs apparently closer to volume production.

So, maybe. May the best display win.

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