Samsung bringing super-size smartphone to US

Jan 10, 2012
Kevin Packingham, Samsung's senior VP of product innovation demonstrates the use of a new stylus pen which Samsung calls the S-Pen during Press Day Events at the annual Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada. South Korean electronics giant Samsung announced plans Monday to bring its super-size smartphone, the Galaxy Note, which also features a stylus for taking notes, to the US.

South Korean electronics giant Samsung announced plans Monday to bring its super-size smartphone, the Galaxy Note, which also features a stylus for taking notes, to the United States.

With a 5.3 inch (13.46-centimeter) touchscreen, the Galaxy Note is considerably wider than most smartphones on the market today.

Apple's latest , the 4S, for example, has a 3.5-inch (8.85-centimeter) display.

In an announcement on the eve of the giant (CES) in , said it will partner with AT&T to sell the Galaxy Note in the United States and it will run on the US telecom carrier's 4G network.

The Galaxy Note, which Samsung describes as a "new category of ," went on sale in Asia and Europe in October. Exact pricing and availability for the US market were not announced.

The Galaxy Note comes with a stylus, called the "S pen," which is housed inside the device and which can be used to write notes on the screen as one would on a piece of paper.

Handwritten notes from the S Pen can also be captured by the device and shared with others.

Samsung is touting the larger, high-resolution screen of the Galaxy Note as superior to standard smartphones for viewing videos, surfing the Web, running applications or reading electronic books.

The Galaxy Note, which is powered by Google's Android software, also comes with front- and rear-facing cameras.

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ThanderMAX
not rated yet Jan 10, 2012
To Samsung, Patent the shape and form - delaying it will cause dire consequences later on.

[Related: Apple sued Samsung for copying shape and design of their iPad]

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