Powering electric vehicles with sunlight

Jan 17, 2012

The Riverside area will become a leader in powering electric vehicles from the sun under a $2 million award to the Center for Environmental Research and Technology at the University of California, Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering.

The two-year project, supported by the South Coast Air Quality Management District and involving a number of public and private partners, will build solar arrays, advanced battery storage, vehicle charging stations, an electric trolley, and a grid management system to provide clean to clean vehicles efficiently.

The funding, approved Jan. 6, will allow the university to install up to two megawatts of solar arrays and two megawatt hours of at three locations on and near the UC Riverside campus. The solar energy will be used to charge vehicles directly at several sites on campus and additional sites throughout Riverside.

In partnership with the City of Riverside and Riverside Public Utilities, UC Riverside engineers will design methods to direct the solar energy to electric vehicle charging in a way that minimizes loads on the grid and demands for electricity generated from non-renewable resources. The system will support the growth in manufacturing and demand for plug-in .

Additionally, UC Riverside plans to convert a trolley from diesel to electric power to shuttle students and area residents around UC Riverside.

"This major effort further propels the city of Riverside and UC Riverside to the forefront of green energy technology," said Matthew Barth, the director of the Center for Environmental Research and Technology and the principal investigator on the $2 million grant.

The project is one of eight funded by the South Coast Air Quality Management District. In total, the district is committing more than $12 million to renewable energy generation, distribution, and storage projects throughout Southern California.

"We're pleased that AQMD recognized the benefits of this project," said Reza Abbaschian, dean of the Bourns College of Engineering. "This is yet another example of our commitment to smart-grid energy solutions that integrate solar energy generation, battery storage, and distribution that are at the core of the mission of CE-CERT and our new Winston Chung Global Energy Center."

The Winston Chung Global Energy Center is a new venture funded by Chinese inventor, entrepreneur and Fellow of the College Winston Chung. Chung's company, Winston Global Energy, will donate 2-megawatts of rare earth lithium-ion batteries for the project.

Bourns, Inc., which is adjacent CE-CERT, will provide the property for the solar installation, and SolarMax, a partner with the college in a number of research projects, will provide the solar panels.

Balqon, a manufacturer of heavy duty electric vehicles, will assist in the conversion of the trolley and in the installation of the battery storage, charging and distribution system. A similar 1.1-megawatt system is currently being tested by Balqon and CE-CERT researchers in advance of its being used to help power Winston Chung Hall on the UCR campus.

The AQMD project is a unique collaboration between the CE-CERT, its industry partners and the City of Riverside, Riverside Public Utilities and Riverside Transit Agency.

"This project will allow us to help the City of Riverside make a huge leap toward in realizing its Green Action Plan," Abbaschian said. "Our research capabilities, combined with the expertise and resources of our industry and municipal agency partners, promises to provide clean, renewable energy solutions in the years ahead."

Explore further: Solar-powered two-seat Sunseeker airplane has progress report

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Researchers Measure Diesel Emissions on the Freeway

Aug 03, 2010

The 53-foot-long tractor trailer that houses UC Riverside's mobile emissions laboratory was back on the road Friday and Monday on Interstate 10 between Redlands and Beaumont testing ways to better measure ...

Research helps drivers cut fuel use

Feb 07, 2011

Ever wonder how much fuel you can save by avoiding stop-and-go traffic, closing your window, not using air conditioning or coasting toward stops?

Cable-free charging of electric cars via coils

Apr 11, 2011

In the future, motorists will no longer need a cable to recharge the batteries of their electric cars, thanks to a development project for inductive charging, which Siemens presented at Hannover Messe 2011. ...

Hybrid tugboat cuts emissions, study shows

Nov 22, 2010

A new study by University of California, Riverside scientists of what is believed to be the world's only hybrid electric tugboat found that the vessel is effective in reducing emissions at the Ports of Los Angeles and Long ...

Solar power blooms in warren

Nov 18, 2011

General Motors is introducing a solar charging canopy that moves with the sun. The Tracking Solar Tree is located at GM Company Vehicle Operations.

Recommended for you

Switch on sunlight for a brighter future

13 hours ago

Imagine sitting in a windowless room yet having the feeling of the sun shining on your face. This unique experience is now possible thanks to the COELUX EU-funded project which recreates the physical and ...

US urged to drop India WTO case on solar

Apr 23, 2014

Environmentalists Wednesday urged the United States to drop plans to haul India to the WTO to open its solar market, saying the action would hurt the fight against climate change.

Is nuclear power the only way to avoid geoengineering?

Apr 23, 2014

"I think one can argue that if we were to follow a strong nuclear energy pathway—as well as doing everything else that we can—then we can solve the climate problem without doing geoengineering." So says Tom Wigley, one ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Genetic code of the deadly tsetse fly unraveled

Mining the genome of the disease-transmitting tsetse fly, researchers have revealed the genetic adaptions that allow it to have such unique biology and transmit disease to both humans and animals.

Ocean microbes display remarkable genetic diversity

The smallest, most abundant marine microbe, Prochlorococcus, is a photosynthetic bacteria species essential to the marine ecosystem. An estimated billion billion billion of the single-cell creatures live i ...