Philippines pushes tobacco - for fish farming

Jan 19, 2012
A woman sells fish in a market in 2010 in Tagbilaran in the Philippines. The Philippines has launched a new campaign promoting tobacco -- not for smoking but for fish farming, a government tobacco agency official said Thursday

The Philippines has launched a new campaign promoting tobacco -- not for smoking but for fish farming, a government tobacco agency official said Thursday.

Over six months, about 400 fish-farmers in the northern coastal province of La Union will be using "tobacco dust" to kill and other predators that prey on fish, said Rex Teoxon of the National Tobacco Administration.

"We are going to train the fisher folk and the whole community on sustainable aqua culture using the tobacco dust," said Teoxon, head of the agency's corporate planning department.

The drive is part of an effort to find alternative uses for the crop in the face of the global anti-smoking campaign.

A no smoking sign is seen at a bus terminal in Manila last year. The Philippines has launched a new campaign promoting tobacco -- not for smoking but for fish farming, a government tobacco agency official said Thursday

The dust, made of pulverised and processed waste tobacco leaves, is a safer alternative to the "long-banned, highly-toxic chemicals" that the fish farmers have been using, Teoxon said.

Tests have found the tobacco dust kills the predators but does not affect the fish raised in the farms, with the active ingredient nicotine evaporating in two to three days, he said.

Additionally, it helps fertilise the waters, promoting the growth of algae that the farmed upon, he added.

The tobacco dust will be provided free to the fish-farmers but if proved to be effective, it will be marketed commercially, said the tobacco official.

In the past, the agency has experimented with using tobacco seeds for human and animal food and it still promotes the use of tobacco stalks for paper and particle boards.

Although the Philippine government has imposed strict controls on smoking and , the tobacco industry still plays a huge part in the economy and the livelihood of thousands.

Teoxon said that a government survey found that in 2010, as many as 2.9 million people were dependent on the including 680,000 farmers and their family members.

Explore further: Japan's new whaling plan will prove hunt is science: negotiator

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Researches link tobacco industry's marketing to youth smoking

Aug 21, 2008

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) released a report, co-edited by University of Minnesota professor Barbara Loken, that reaches the government's strongest conclusion to date that tobacco marketing and depictions of smoking ...

States urged to continue anti-tobacco ads

Jul 06, 2005

Teenagers who are exposed to state-sponsored anti-tobacco advertising are less likely to smoke, University of Illinois at Chicago researchers said Tuesday.

Pesticides found in tobacco smoke

Apr 18, 2006

Colorado chemists have discovered for the first time government-approved pesticides are present at dangerous levels in tobacco smoke.

Recommended for you

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.