Nielsen: 1.4 percent of those who recently bought smartphones chose Windows phone

Jan 20, 2012 By Janet I. Tu

Only 1.4 percent of U.S. consumers who said they bought a smartphone in the last three months chose Windows Phone, according to research from Nielsen.

Windows Phone held a comparable share - 1.3 percent - among all U.S. smartphone users, according to Nielsen's survey of smartphone owners in the fourth quarter of 2011.

According to Nielsen's research, even the aged Windows held more share than Windows Phone 7. Among those who said they bought a smartphone in the past three months, 2.4 percent chose a Windows Mobile device. Among all smartphone users, Windows Mobile held a 4.6 percent share.

Nielsen's research also showed the 4S, launched in the fall, boosted Apple's share considerably. Among those who got a new device in the last three months, 44.5 percent of those surveyed in December said they chose an iPhone, compared to just 25.1 percent in October, according to Nielsen.

still held most of the market with 51.7 percent of recent acquirers choosing an Android device, and 46.3 percent of all smartphone owners saying they have an Android .

Nielsen found that as of the fourth quarter 2011, 46 percent of U.S. mobile consumers had smartphones with the figure going up quickly.

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btb101
not rated yet Jan 20, 2012
1.4 %...
this is not news, it is embarrassing. the once mighty mogul of software has finally had it's day.

over priced, buggy and bloated. that is how 99% of people look at m/s software.

who would buy a car that was broken? well, you windows users buy an operating system that is broken, and that is before you use it.
Meyer
not rated yet Jan 23, 2012
I have a WP7 phone, but I bought it much longer than 3 months ago (and Nielsen didn't ask me anyway). I think it would be doing better in the market if they had waited for the "Mango" release to be the first release. This is more of a business blunder than a technical blunder. It's actually a very nice OS now, but it was definitely lacking essential features for almost a year. The infrequent updates (along with the first update disaster) caused enthusiasm to collapse.