First images of newly discovered primate

Jan 10, 2012
World's first images of Mynamar snub-nosed monkey caught on film. Credit: FFI/BANCA/PRCF

(PhysOrg.com) -- Researchers working in Northern Myanmar have captured the first photographs of the recently discovered Myanmar snub-nosed monkey.

Announced today in Yangon, Myanmar, a joint team from Fauna & Flora International (FFI), Biodiversity And Nature Conservation Association (BANCA) and People Resources and Conservation Foundation (PRCF), caught pictures of the monkey on camera traps placed in the high, forested mountains of Kachin state, bordering China.

“The Myanmar snub-nosed monkey was described scientifically in 2010 from a dead specimen collected from a local hunter,” said Frank Momberg of FFI, who organised the initial expeditions that led to the monkey’s discovery. “As yet, no scientist has seen a live individual,” he added.

“These images are the first record of the animal in its natural habitat,” said Ngwe Lwin, the Burmese national who first recognized the monkey as a possible new species. “It is great to finally have because they show us something about how and where it actually lives,” he added.

Myanmar snub-nosed monkey with infants. Credit: FFI/BANCA/PRCF

Heavy snows in January and constant rain in April made expeditions to set the camera traps difficult. “We were dealing with very tough conditions in a remote and rugged area that contained perhaps fewer than 200 ,” said Jeremy Holden, who led the camera trapping team. “We didn’t know exactly where they lived, and I didn’t hold out much hope of short term success with this work.” But in May a small group of snub-nosed monkeys walked past one of the cameras and into history. “We were very surprised to get these pictures,” said Saw Soe Aung, a field biologist who set the cameras. “It was exciting to see that some of the females were carrying babies – a new generation of our rarest .”

As with most of Asia’s rare mammals, the snub-nosed monkey is threatened by habitat loss and hunting. The team is now working together with the Ministry of Environmental Conservation and Forest (MOECAF), local authorities and communities to help safeguard the future of the species. In February this year, FFI and MOECAF will hold an international workshop in Yangon aiming to create a conservation action plan for the Myanmar snub-nosed monkey.

In addition to the world’s first images of the snub-nosed monkey, the camera trapping also caught photos of other globally threatened species including red panda, takin, marbled cat, Malayan sun bear and rare pheasants such as Temminick’s tragopan, documenting the importance of this area for biodiversity conservation.

Explore further: New research reveals clock ticking for fruit flies

More information: www.fauna-flora.org/species/my… r-snub-nosed-monkey/

Provided by Fauna & Flora International

4.2 /5 (14 votes)
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New snub-nosed monkey discovered in Northern Myanmar

Oct 26, 2010

An international team of primatologists have discovered a new species of monkey in Northern Myanmar (formerly Burma.) The research, published in the American Journal of Primatology, reveals how Rhinopithecus strykeri, ...

Three new bat species discovered in Indochina

Sep 05, 2011

Three new bat species have been discovered after an international team of scientists from the Hungarian Natural History Museum (HNHM) and Fauna & Flora International (FFI) embarked on a study in southern Indochina.

Rare bay cat spotted in Pulong Tau national park

Feb 11, 2011

A statement by PTNP’s project manager Dr. Paul Chai Pang Kiong said three images of the cat had been captured via camera traps by the Forest Department Sarawak and Sarawak Forestry Corporation.

Species, threats grow in Mekong region: WWF

Dec 12, 2011

Scientists identify a new species every two days in the Greater Mekong region, the WWF said Monday, in a report detailing 2010's more unusual finds such as a leaf warbler and a self-cloning lizard.

Recommended for you

Orb-weaving spiders living in urban areas may be larger

9 hours ago

A common orb-weaving spider may grow larger and have an increased ability to reproduce when living in urban areas, according to a study published August 20, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Eli ...

User comments : 4

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

epsi00
5 / 5 (1) Jan 10, 2012
The photographs also show where they can be captured and killed.
tadchem
Jan 10, 2012
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
Isaacsname
5 / 5 (1) Jan 10, 2012
Could you imagine what it would feel like to be hunted to the brink of disappearing forever ? They probably live in constant fear.
Smarrelli
4.7 / 5 (3) Jan 10, 2012
Am I the only one seeing the resemblance to Michael Jackson here?
Tangent2
1 / 5 (1) Jan 11, 2012
For those that said if there was a bigfoot like creature that we would have found it by now, I point you to this article.