Britain ranks top risks posed by climate change

Jan 26, 2012

(AP) -- Britain says coastlines, wildlife and even the nation's most famous dish are under threat from climate change in its first-ever national assessment of likely risks.

The 2.8 million pound ($4.4 million) study sets out the most pressing problems expected to affect the United Kingdom as a result of .

Britain's government said Thursday that higher temperatures could see as many as 5,900 more people die as a result of hot summers, but predicts a sharp reduction in deaths due to by the 2050s.

Other risks include increased pollution and energy demands.

The report says Britain's stocks of cod - a key component of the nation's beloved fish and chips dish - will dwindle, but should be replaced by more plentiful numbers of plaice and sole.

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