US turns down volume on LOUD TV ads

Dec 13, 2011
US telecom regulators ordered television stations on Tuesday to turn down the volume on commercials.

US telecom regulators ordered television stations on Tuesday to turn down the volume on commercials.

"The rules adopted today require that commercials have the same average volume as the programs they accompany," the () said in a statement.

The FCC said the move was a "major step toward eliminating one of the most persistent problems of the television age -- loud commercials."

"While consumer complaints about loud commercials have diminished since 2009, we expect that these new rules will reduce loudness complaints still further," the FCC said.

The new rules will take effect on December 13, 2012, giving enough time to be in compliance, the FCC said.

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User comments : 14

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dschlink
5 / 5 (1) Dec 13, 2011
Commercials basically drove me off TV, but it was the content I had trouble with, not the volume level.
Nanobanano
5 / 5 (4) Dec 13, 2011
THANK YOU.

Wish there was a damn law limiting the maximum percentage of an hour that can be commercials.

I swear, half the segment is nothing but commercials now.

Maybe if professional atheletes weren't paid so damn much, the cable bill would be much cheaper too.
Eric_B
2 / 5 (4) Dec 13, 2011
at least this article is short so we know none of our good friends at physorg flubbed this one.

it ALREADY WAS ILLEGAL!!!

it is an effective manipulation technique long ago proven.

it is interesting what laws this administration chooses to enforce and which not.

did the president kids and wife complain to much???
Dug
not rated yet Dec 13, 2011
How is it that when I started to pay for cable tv it was to get away from the constant irritating interruption of intellectually challenged commercial messages. Now I pay for cable and have to watch (always mute commercials) the damn commercials - talk about adding insult to injury.

How bright would you have to be to understand that irritating the hell of consumers doesn't sell products? What, TV marketing companies haven't figured out that 75% of the population uses the internet to research the goods they buy and now about half of all goods are bought over the internet. I've read 4 surveys this week going on about how important a marketing tool Twitter has become. Apparently, they didn't read the PEW survey earlier this year that said only 13% of Twitterites were over 18. The people that buy advertising on TV. or anywhere for that matter - that don't know or ignore their consumers preferences and demographics, have to be some the dumbest people on the planet.
Nanobanano
1 / 5 (2) Dec 13, 2011
The people that buy advertising on TV. or anywhere for that matter - that don't know or ignore their consumers preferences and demographics, have to be some the dumbest people on the planet.


Actually, they aren't dumb.

You just don't understand the demographic THEY are marketing to, which is the older, dumber, uneducated people who don't even know how to turn on a computer and refuse to learn as well, i.e. 55 years and up.

Parsec
3.3 / 5 (7) Dec 14, 2011
The people that buy advertising on TV. or anywhere for that matter - that don't know or ignore their consumers preferences and demographics, have to be some the dumbest people on the planet.


Actually, they aren't dumb.

You just don't understand the demographic THEY are marketing to, which is the older, dumber, uneducated people who don't even know how to turn on a computer and refuse to learn as well, i.e. 55 years and up.


I am 59 and have been building computer systems and software architectures for 35 years. Try generalizing less.
red60
5 / 5 (1) Dec 14, 2011

I just wish they would turn down the average volume of the music and special effects, relative to the dialog.
FrankHerbert
1.9 / 5 (13) Dec 14, 2011

I am 59 and have been building computer systems and software architectures for 35 years. Try generalizing less.


BULLSHIT!

You are in your 70's, a disgraced astrophysicist, and a pederast.

You are Oliver Manuel.

omatumr, Member since: September 24, 2007, 11:57 am
Parsec, Member since: September 24, 2007, 11:58 am

Osiris1
not rated yet Dec 14, 2011
Been lied to by networks for many decades about loud commercials. Networks always said the commercials were the same volume as the programs. They lied...since forever. Commercials are not only louder, but more strident in sensitive hearing frequencies. Must downclick volume in commercials four to five clicks to equalize. Now looks like government did not believe them either.
Noumenon
1 / 5 (1) Dec 14, 2011

I am 59 and have been building computer systems and software architectures for 35 years. Try generalizing less.


BULLSHIT!

You are in your 70's, a disgraced astrophysicist, and a pederast.

You are Oliver Manuel.

omatumr, Member since: September 24, 2007, 11:57 am
Parsec, Member since: September 24, 2007, 11:58 am



Hmm, coincidence? Do you see any other similarities? They don't seem to post the same. You are the expert of multiple screen names though...
Royale
not rated yet Dec 14, 2011
I love that this is actually happening, but it sure is a bit late... With my DVR now I literally don't watch ANY commercials. If something is live that I want to watch I throw it on record, watch something else for about 20 minutes, then put it on. That completely skirts around commercials. The only commercials I'm then stuck with are on the Free on Demand things, but that's something I accept because I've obviously missed recording something if I have to go back to On Demand network shows...
FrankHerbert
1.6 / 5 (7) Dec 14, 2011
Hmm, coincidence?

You don't even seem to need that to wage such criticisms against me. Why the double standard?


I am 59 and have been building computer systems and software architectures for 35 years. Try generalizing less.


BULLSHIT!

You are in your 70's, a disgraced astrophysicist, and a pederast.

You are Oliver Manuel.

omatumr, Member since: September 24, 2007, 11:57 am
Parsec, Member since: September 24, 2007, 11:58 am



Hmm, coincidence? Do you see any other similarities? They don't seem to post the same. You are the expert of multiple screen names though...


Actually I thought you were. You seem to take a very scholarly attitude towards such things. Call omatumr a pedo and see how fast Parsec votes you down.

It's very sad you would support an incestuous pederast in some misguided attempt to discredit me.
nkalanaga
not rated yet Dec 14, 2011
The law has been that commercials couldn't be louder than the program, but the limit was based on the loudest volume recorded during the program. A short period of high volume in an otherwise quiet program would allow for consistently loud commercials. The new law is based on average volume, so a short period of high volume won't have much effect on the allowed commercial volume.
Vendicar_Decarian
5 / 5 (1) Dec 18, 2011
This new law is just another example of how the Nanny State is regulating American business into the ground.

Corporate America needs freedom to make Americans deaf, dumb and blind.