Steve Jobs statue unveiled in Budapest

December 21, 2011
The statue of the late co-founder of Apple, Steve Jobs, at the Graphisoft Park in the third district of Budapest, after the inaugurating ceremony organized by a Hungarian Graphisopt SE for the Apple's legendary founder. The almost two-metre-high (6.5-foot) bronze statue by Hungarian sculptor Erno Toth depicts Jobs with his trademark turtleneck jumper, jeans, sneakers and round glasses.

A larger-than-life bronze statue of the late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs was unveiled in a Budapest science park Wednesday, two months after his death.

" made technology available to the masses first over the desktop, then in our pockets," said Gabor Bojar, the founder of Graphisoft, a which decided to erect the statue.

Jobs, who died on October 5 following a long battle with cancer, "was the creator of technology with a human face," he said, calling Jobs "a mentor of sorts".

The almost two-metre-high (6.5-foot) bronze statue by Hungarian sculptor Erno Toth depicts Jobs with his trademark turtleneck jumper, jeans, sneakers and round glasses.

It was erected in a science park that hosts several IT companies, including Graphisoft, which Apple has supported since 1984 when Jobs saw it at the international trade fair in Germany, according to the Hungarian company.

"He left his mark," Bojar said.

Explore further: Private tribute to Steve Jobs planned for Sunday

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rawa1
not rated yet Dec 21, 2011
It's quite symptomatic, the big men of Western word are praised in satellite countries, rather than at the places of their origin. The Hungary feels threatened with Russia (most of oil and gas is imported from there) and it inclines to American style of life in more iconic way, than large Western countries. For poor Hungarians the Steve Job is a symbol of wealthiness and freedom. Analogously, the Baltic countries or Serbia declare their affinity to western style of life in proclamative way. It's sorta analogy of dipole polarization or dark matter effect. From the dual reason the rich Germany is rather dismissive to the Jobs heritage and Apple company as a whole.

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