55": LG announces world's largest OLED TV panel

Dec 27, 2011

LG Display announced that it has developed the world's largest 55-inch OLED (Organic Light Emitting Diodes) TV panel. The 55-inch panel is a significant step forward in the popularization of OLED TVs and demonstrates the effective application of AM OLED technology to larger panel sizes at a more cost efficient level.

"Our objective has always been to actively define and lead emerging markets," said Dr. Sang Beom Han, CEO and Executive Vice President of LG Display. "Although OLED technology is seen as the future of TV display, the technology has been limited to smaller display sizes and by high costs, until now. LG Display's 55-inch OLED TV panel has overcome these barriers."

LG Display's 55" OLED TV panel produces remarkable image quality with no after image due to its high reaction velocity, as well as high of over 100,000:1 and wider color gamut than that produced by .

OLED, a medium that controls pixels is a departure from LCD panels which utilize liquid crystals. The new technology allows to self-generate light and features a reaction velocity to over 1000 times faster than .

The environmentally conscious will also appreciate LG Display's 55" OLED TV panel. While light sources in backlight units, like LCD panels, must always be kept on, the OLED panel allows diodes to be turned on or off which enables than conventional LCD panels.

With no need for a special light source, LG Display's 55" OLED TV panel is also able to utilize a simplified structure thinner than that of a pen (5mm), and lighter than LCD panels. The panel's minimalist structure also allows for the realization of unique .

Although industry watchers anticipate OLED as the future of TV display, to date, the technology has faced challenges due to limitations on the sizes of displays it can be applied to and a high level of investment required. LG Display has successfully addressed these issues with its 55" OLED TV panel.

The panel adopts an Oxide TFT technology for backplane which is different from a Low Temperature Poly Silicon (LTPS) type generally used in existing small-sized OLED panels. The Oxide TFT type that LG Display utilizes is similar to the existing TFT process, with the simple difference lying in replacing Amorphous Silicon with Oxide. Moreover, the Oxide TFT type produces identical image quality to high performance of LTPS base panels at significantly reduced investment levels.

Additionally, LG Display uses White OLED (WOLED). WOLED vertically accumulates red, green, and blue diodes. With white color light emitting from the diode, it displays screen information through color layers below the TFT base panel, which leads to a lower error rate, higher productivity, and a clearer Ultra Definition screen via the benefits of small pixels. Further, it is possible to realize identical colors in diverse angles via color information displayed through a thin layer. Lower electricity consumption in web browsing environments for smart TVs is another key strength of WOLED.

The world's first 55" panel from LG Display will be made available for showing to select media and customers at a private booth starting on January 9 in Las Vegas through the end of CES 2012.

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User comments : 9

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ackzsel
1 / 5 (2) Dec 27, 2011
Well, it's great and all that they produced a display of such size but I'm actually more interested in other things like how long will it last and how will the different colors degenerate. It's organic after all.
CHollman82
3.2 / 5 (5) Dec 27, 2011
It's organic after all.


/facepalm

Organic means it contains carbon, that's it.

http://en.wikiped...compound
PS3
3 / 5 (2) Dec 28, 2011
It's organic after all.


/facepalm

Organic means it contains carbon, that's it.

http://en.wikiped...compound


He is right.OLED main problem is the blue OLED breaks down far faster than LCD.
Shifty0x88
not rated yet Dec 30, 2011
So... how much does that TV cost?
sirchick
not rated yet Dec 30, 2011
Far more than any one has sense to buy one at this stage, im sure its over 10k easily.
Vendicar_Decarian
1 / 5 (1) Jan 01, 2012
Why? Because we can.
Moebius
1 / 5 (1) Jan 01, 2012
Although industry watchers anticipate OLED as the future of TV display, to date, the technology has faced challenges due to limitations on the sizes of displays it can be applied to and a high level of investment required. LG Display has successfully addressed these issues with its 55" OLED TV panel.


Actually the biggest problem with OLED is the one they don't mention, lifetime. The usable lifetime last time I checked was significantly less than an LCD. I wouldn't buy this unless I had money to throw away. Burn-in is probably worse with this technology too.

I agree that emissive displays are the way of the future but OLED has a way to go before it replaces transmissive LCDs. Probably another 10 years before they become competitive and something better might come along by then. OLED isn't the only other kid on the block either.
canuckit
not rated yet Jan 01, 2012
Are there any LCD or OLED screens made in the USA?
wiyosaya
5 / 5 (1) Jan 02, 2012
Well, it's great and all that they produced a display of such size but I'm actually more interested in other things like how long will it last and how will the different colors degenerate. It's organic after all.


He is right.OLED main problem is the blue OLED breaks down far faster than LCD.

More info here - http://www.oled-d...hnology/

Lifetime on all colors is said to be on the order of 100,000 hours.

With luck, this is the real deal.

Samsung is also showing a 55" OLED set at CES 2012.