Facebook fixes photo privacy bug

Dec 07, 2011
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg speaks in San Francisco in September 2011. Facebook has fixed a bug that allowed the viewing of some private photographs of other members and which was reportedly used to access personal pictures of founder Mark Zuckerberg.

Facebook has fixed a bug that allowed the viewing of some private photographs of other members and which was reportedly used to access personal pictures of founder Mark Zuckerberg.

The bug involved Facebook's system of reporting inappropriate images on the social network.

By reporting a member's profile picture as inappropriate a user was asked whether they had other photographs to report, providing access to other private pictures.

The was first revealed in a bodybuilding forum at bodybuilding.com.

"We discovered a bug in one of our reporting flows that allows people to report multiple instances of inappropriate content simultaneously," said in a statement.

"The bug allowed anyone to view a limited number of another user's most recently uploaded photos irrespective of the for these photos," it said.

"This was the result of one of our recent code pushes and was live for a limited period of time," Facebook said.

"Upon discovering the bug, we immediately disabled the system, and will only return functionality once we can confirm the bug has been fixed," it said.

An unidentified Facebook user who exploited the bug posted 14 pictures of Zuckerberg to the image-sharing website Imgur along with the comment: "It's time to fix those Facebook..."

The user claimed they were taken from Zuckerberg's Facebook page although a number of the pictures have previously been released publicly.

Facebook, which has more than 800 million members, agreed in a deal with the US last week to tighten its privacy policies and submit to external audits in order to settle charges that it abused users' personal data.

In its statement about the photo bug, Facebook said "the privacy of our user's data is a top priority for us, and we invest significant resources in protecting our site and the people who use it."

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User comments : 2

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that_guy
not rated yet Dec 07, 2011
you bet your sweet ass FB fixed this as quickly as possible. Zuckerberg needs his privacy.
aroc91
5 / 5 (1) Dec 07, 2011
you bet your sweet ass FB fixed this as quickly as possible. Zuckerberg needs his privacy.


Yeah, something tells me this wouldn't have been as prompt if it didn't happen to him.

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