EU launches new 6.5-bln fund to slash over-fishing

Dec 02, 2011
The European Commission unveiled a new 6.5-billion-euro fund Friday to help fishermen move towards sustainable fishing
Traders sell fish in Kampala in August 2011. The European Commission unveiled a new 6.5-billion-euro fund Friday to help fishermen move towards sustainable fishing as part of an effort to save fish stocks.

The European Commission unveiled a new 6.5-billion-euro fund Friday to help fishermen move towards sustainable fishing as part of an effort to save fish stocks.

"This new fund will increase economic growth and create jobs in the sector. No more money will be spent to build big vessels," said the EU's fisheries commissioner Maria Damanaki.

"Small scale fisheries and aquaculture will benefit from this budgetary greening of the Common Fisheries Policy," she said.

But environmentalists said the seven-year fund does not go far enough to cut down on over-fishing off Europe's coasts.

It will replace the existing European Fisheries Fund (EFF), which has been criticised by wildlife groups.

"After the poor performance of the EFF, subsidies are only justifiable if they help to end overfishing and stimulate the sustainable management of fisheries," said WWF fisheries expert Louize Hill.

"Unfortunately, the EMFF proposal lacks the ambition to help transform Europe's and lay a solid basis for healthy and profitable fisheries in the future," she said.

The new fund notably will help replace nets with more selective gear in a bid to reduce discards, develop "green" aquaculture and support partnerships between the sector and scientists.

Funds will also be available to spouses of fishermen for training or other economic activities related to fishing.

Explore further: Five anthropogenic factors that will radically alter northern forests in 50 years

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

EU sets fish quotas for 2007

Dec 22, 2006

The European Union fisheries ministers have set the 2007 limits for fish catches in European waters.

Scientists offer new take on selective fishing

Apr 29, 2010

(PhysOrg.com) -- A new, less selective approach to commercial fishing is needed to ensure the ongoing productivity of marine ecosystems and to maintain biodiversity, according to a paper in the Proceedings ...

Global fisheries research finds promise and peril

Sep 14, 2010

Global fisheries, a vital source of food and revenue throughout the world, contribute between US$225-$240 billion per year to the worldwide economy, according to four new studies released today. Researchers also concluded ...

Britain steamed over tuna rules

May 10, 2007

Britain's fisheries minister Ben Bradshaw is calling on the European Union to ban fishing for bluefin tuna in the Mediterranean Sea.

Recommended for you

More, bigger wildfires burning western US, study shows

15 hours ago

Wildfires across the western United States have been getting bigger and more frequent over the last 30 years – a trend that could continue as climate change causes temperatures to rise and drought to become ...

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

omatumr
1 / 5 (6) Dec 03, 2011
The European Commission unveiled a new 6.5-billion-euro fund


I thought the EU was bankrupt. Please explain.

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
http://myprofile....anuelo09
ryggesogn2
1 / 5 (3) Dec 03, 2011
MarkyMark
5 / 5 (2) Dec 03, 2011
The European Commission unveiled a new 6.5-billion-euro fund


I thought the EU was bankrupt. Please explain.

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
Avid Paedofile for NASA
And Neutron fantasist.
http://myprofile....anuelo09

No! Now go away and do something you are familuar with such as loving your children.

More news stories

Six Nepalese dead, six missing in Everest avalanche

At least six Nepalese climbing guides have been killed and six others are missing after an avalanche struck Mount Everest early Friday in one of the deadliest accidents on the world's highest peak, officials ...

China says massive area of its soil polluted

A huge area of China's soil covering more than twice the size of Spain is estimated to be polluted, the government said Thursday, announcing findings of a survey previously kept secret.

There's something ancient in the icebox

Glaciers are commonly thought to work like a belt sander. As they move over the land they scrape off everything—vegetation, soil, and even the top layer of bedrock. So scientists were greatly surprised ...

Clean air: Fewer sources for self-cleaning

Up to now, HONO, also known as nitrous acid, was considered one of the most important sources of hydroxyl radicals (OH), which are regarded as the detergent of the atmosphere, allowing the air to clean itself. ...

Scientists tether lionfish to Cayman reefs

Research done by U.S. scientists in the Cayman Islands suggests that native predators can be trained to gobble up invasive lionfish that colonize regional reefs and voraciously prey on juvenile marine creatures.

Leeches help save woman's ear after pit bull mauling

(HealthDay)—A pit bull attack in July 2013 left a 19-year-old woman with her left ear ripped from her head, leaving an open wound. After preserving the ear, the surgical team started with a reconnection ...