China plans Asia's biggest coal-fired power plant

Dec 27, 2011
The cooling towers of a coal-powered power plant in the suburbs of Beijing. China's Shenhua Group will build the largest coal-fired power station in Asia over the next five years, the official Xinhua news agency said Tuesday, as the country struggles to meet its energy needs.

China's Shenhua Group will build the largest coal-fired power station in Asia over the next five years, the official Xinhua news agency said Tuesday, as the country struggles to meet its energy needs.

China's biggest company and officials in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region signed a deal for the 8-gigawatt thermal plant on Monday, according to Xinhua and the local government's website.

The plant would be built in the southern port city of Beihai to help ease power shortages caused by drought, which has strained power supplies.

China relies on coal for nearly 70 percent of its energy needs, which have soared in recent years as the country's economy grew at a blistering pace.

Power outages and rationing have been imposed in 17 provinces this year and shortages could worsen if coal supplies are not increased or if the country's north sees particularly harsh winter weather.

Shenhua's plans come days after were ordered to reduce emissions of "major pollutants" by as much as 10 percent by 2015, amid growing public anxiety over bad air.

China is the world's biggest emitter with many of its cities cloaked in a polluted haze.

Shenhua and the Guangxi government will ensure the new plant's eight get a steady supply of coal from company mines in Indonesia and Australia by building four 100,000-tonne deepwater loading docks, Xinhua said.

Beihai city will also build a coal storage facility capable of handling 30 million tonnes a year in the nearby port of Tieshan.

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CapitalismPrevails
3.7 / 5 (6) Dec 27, 2011
I would feel a lot better if it were a coal gasification plant instead. Yes they're more expensive but atleast you get most the benefits of reliable coal power without mercury, arsenic, and lots of coal ash.
Pirouette
3.2 / 5 (11) Dec 27, 2011
Uh oh. . .Howhot is gonna be all over THIS one. . .LOL

from the article: ""Shenhua and the Guangxi government will ensure the new plant's eight power generators get a steady supply of coal from company mines in Indonesia and Australia by building four 100,000-tonne deepwater loading docks""

So THAT's why a group of Chinese went to Australia. . .I figured they weren't there to hunt kangaroos. . .:)
mo' money mo' money mo' money
BOYCOTT WALMART DRY GOODS FROM CHINA
ShotmanMaslo
3.7 / 5 (7) Dec 27, 2011
So much for cutting emissions.. At least I hope they install some good filters to make the emissions less harmful.

They need to develop that thorium molten salt reactor ASAP, otherwise they wont have a chance to phase out dirty energy, and keep economic growth.
that_guy
4 / 5 (4) Dec 27, 2011
Actually, if you look at china's power sources, you'll see that a substantial amount of power comes from older, smaller, and very dirty coal plants that release a large amount of CO2 in addition to many other pollutants.

By building a single, large, new plant under their new standards, it cuts down immensely on all pollutants, including black carbon.

By building a single large plant up to new standards, the plant also produces a far lower amount of CO2 per unit of energy because newer, better equipment, and economies of scale for the combustion process - It is far more efficient than most chinese coal plants.

Even though we see it as bad compared to western standards, it is far superior than a lot of what they have for chinese standards.
wmccutchen
5 / 5 (2) Dec 28, 2011
Wet cooling an 8GW thermal plant in a drought will be a challenge.
mosahlah
5 / 5 (1) Jan 02, 2012
more sulphur dioxide to shield us from the harmful effects of the sun...
rubberman
not rated yet Jan 04, 2012
A newer cleaner plant is only beneficial if the high polluting antiquated ones are decomissioned...given how much "catching up" China still has to do as far as infrastructure is concerned I don't see the older ones being shut down any time soon....