US closes 150 websites in counterfeit crackdown

Nov 28, 2011
Counterfeit goods are on display during the announcement of the seizure of websites offering counterfeit goods like sports jerseys and luxury handbags in 2010 in Washington, DC. The shutdowns, launched last week on the eve of the "Black Friday" post-Thanksgiving shopping surge, hit websites that were mostly backed by China-based counterfeiters.

US authorities said Monday they have shut down 150 websites offering counterfeit goods like sports jerseys and luxury handbags in an operation tied to the pre-Christmas shopping surge.

The shutdowns, launched last week on the eve of the "" post-Thanksgiving shopping surge, hit websites that were mostly backed by China-based counterfeiters, according to John Morton, director of the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), which led the operation.

ICE seized the domain names of the websites, posting a statement declaring the seizure on the website home pages.

"In a day when many consumers are shopping on line, we have, working together, disrupted the sale of thousands and thousands of ," said Lanny Breuer, assistant attorney general of the Department of Justice.

Most of the shuttered websites were offering jerseys and other items of US , basketball, and hockey teams.

The counterfeit jerseys from one, NFLjerseyssupply.org, sold football jerseys for $46 that on official sites go for up to $115.

Other sites offered brand-name sunglasses, Louis Vuitton handbags, Ugg boots among other products.

"They are exactly the kinds of products that Americans are looking for," said Breuer.

The announcement of the seizure came on "," a day when online has surged in recent years.

Morton said that, as in last year's operation, which shut down 58 websites, the operations were mainly overseas, "predominantly from China."

He also said some were backed by organized crime, but declined to give any details.

"We're all very concerned... about the connection to organized crime and the ability for the profits from these sorts of crimes fueling other criminal activities."

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User comments : 26

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Nerdyguy
1.6 / 5 (7) Nov 28, 2011
Wow, we're all safe now I suppose.
kochevnik
not rated yet Nov 28, 2011
There will be a migration to the ".co" domain to escape the failing empire and it's death grip on unsuspecting sitemasters.
Nerdyguy
1 / 5 (6) Nov 28, 2011
There will be a migration to the ".co" domain to escape the failing empire and it's death grip on unsuspecting sitemasters.


Irrelevant. Domain name is a non-factor.
pauljpease
3.3 / 5 (7) Nov 28, 2011
Counterfeit shirt, huh. So it looks like a shirt but, what, doesn't have any holes in it for your head and arms? What they mean is that they are all about protecting the rights of multibillion-dollar industries. And that interfering in a free market is ok as long as you pay your politician well to keep the rules tipped in your favor. Seriously, if I want to buy a sports jersey to represent my favorite team, and I find a business that can make it and sell it for 25% of another business, that's how free-market capitalism is supposed to work, right? Oh, except now they allow everything to be copyrighted and patented so there's nothing close to a free market anymore.
nejc2008
1 / 5 (1) Nov 28, 2011
Unfortunately, I agree with you competely.
Deesky
5 / 5 (4) Nov 28, 2011
Counterfeit shirt, huh. So it looks like a shirt but, what, doesn't have any holes in it for your head and arms? What they mean is that they are all about protecting the rights of multibillion-dollar industries. And that interfering in a free market is ok as long as you pay your politician well to keep the rules tipped in your favor

It's not about paying off politicians, it's about protecting brands and trade marks. Successful companies have a lot invested in their brands and they have the right to protect them.

It's not about being able to make a cheaper shirt, it's about the fraudulent use of the brand name that's affixed to that shirt. It not only takes sales away from the owner of the brand (which they worked hard to establish) but it can also diminish said brand if the knockoff is of inferior quality.
_nigmatic10
1.3 / 5 (3) Nov 29, 2011
@Deesky
If those said companies are american based creating and selling to the american people i back what you said 100%. If they're not, then it shouldn't be our problem.
LivaN
2.3 / 5 (3) Nov 29, 2011
It's not about being able to make a cheaper shirt, it's about the fraudulent use of the brand name that's affixed to that shirt.

Unfortunately the brand has become part of the product, making a cheaper alternative illegal. Please show me where I can purchase a cheap NFL jersey? How do you make a cheaper alternative to a Louis Vuitton handbag without violating the brand?

If you want your brand not to be copied, don't make it the product you're selling.
ABSOLUTEKNOWLEDGE
1 / 5 (2) Nov 29, 2011
fourth reich in action

next goes alternative news

like alex jones

so they can keep the sheep in the little box
jsdarkdestruction
3.5 / 5 (2) Nov 29, 2011
It's not about being able to make a cheaper shirt, it's about the fraudulent use of the brand name that's affixed to that shirt.

Unfortunately the brand has become part of the product, making a cheaper alternative illegal. Please show me where I can purchase a cheap NFL jersey? How do you make a cheaper alternative to a Louis Vuitton handbag without violating the brand?

If you want your brand not to be copied, don't make it the product you're selling.

pretty simple, you make a copy of those bags and sell them but dont put louis vuitton on the bag..duh!
Nerdyguy
1 / 5 (1) Nov 30, 2011
So it looks like a shirt but, what, doesn't have any holes in it for your head and arms?


hehe, good one.

What they mean is that they are all about protecting the rights of multibillion-dollar industries...


I'm not a fan of the govt. wasting time/money on this. But, it's really not a "free-market" issue. Copyright/patent and things like the NFL having contractual agreements are long standing protections afforded to parties providing goods and services. And, while it's got some problems, it's been a source of economic and technological progress for the overall good.

No one would ever invest $100 million to invent anything if there was no payback.

The clothing & accessories are just the low-hanging fruit that we laugh at and that makes it all seem cheap. But, in another article on PhysOrg, people were complaining that drug companies aren't making enough antibiotics. Without protections like these, NO ONE would make ANY.
Nerdyguy
1 / 5 (1) Nov 30, 2011
It's not about being able to make a cheaper shirt, it's about the fraudulent use of the brand name that's affixed to that shirt.

Unfortunately the brand has become part of the product, making a cheaper alternative illegal. Please show me where I can purchase a cheap NFL jersey? How do you make a cheaper alternative to a Louis Vuitton handbag without violating the brand?


And, where exactly can I find that law that says you are legally entitled to purchase a "cheap" NFL Jersey or Louis Vuitton purse?

Oh, yeah, there's not one....

What you are displaying then is a sentiment. A personal feeling that you should be able to have whatever you want for whatever price whenever its convenient for you.

Bottom line: no manufacturer should be required to bow to your sentimental needs.
bluehigh
1 / 5 (1) Nov 30, 2011
So, on the whim of a bureaucrat the US Government can shut down websites by changing DNS records.

The right to natural justice has been usurped by a protection racket sponsored by the US government. How is that any more moral or righteous than the counterfeiters?
Nerdyguy
1 / 5 (1) Nov 30, 2011
So, on the whim of a bureaucrat the US Government can shut down websites by changing DNS records.


You're misinformed. No whim was involved. Rather, international treaties, U.S. and international laws, decades of negotiations and billions (trillions?) of dollars spent.

And all perfectly legal.

The right to natural justice has been usurped by a protection racket sponsored by the US government. How is that any more moral or righteous than the counterfeiters?


"Natural Justice"? If you're British, this has a specific meaning and does not apply here. If you mean something akin to human rights, that also doesn't apply.

Laws were broken. Criminals were dealt with. Period.

It's only "more moral" (your words) if you believe in being a law abiding citizen. Oh, I see...

bluehigh
1 / 5 (2) Nov 30, 2011
Laws were broken. Criminals were dealt with ..


Can you provide a reference where a court of law has found these people guilty of a crime. Or has law and order completely broken down in the USA? Oh thats right .. in America its the 'Golden Rule'. Those that have the gold make the rules, like some amoral thugs. Oh I see ..
bluehigh
1 / 5 (1) Nov 30, 2011
Successful companies have a lot invested in their brands and they have the right to protect them.
- Deesky

Yes Deesky, however was this a matter of influence to allow extra-judicial action? Surely, regardless of the obvious counterfeiting, these people had a right to a fair hearing and to defend themselves. Oh silly me, I forgot in the USA extra-ordinary rendition (aka kidnapping) is an accepted practice.
Nerdyguy
1 / 5 (2) Nov 30, 2011
Laws were broken. Criminals were dealt with ..


Can you provide a reference where a court of law has found these people guilty of a crime. Or has law and order completely broken down in the USA? Oh thats right .. in America its the 'Golden Rule'. Those that have the gold make the rules, like some amoral thugs. Oh I see ..


Oh, my, you are so very confused about the rule of law.

All around the world, police agencies chase criminals who have broken laws. In the process, they take assets, jail people, shut down services, sometimes shut down whole organizations.

This has nothing to do with America. It is typical, straightforward, boring police procedure and happens every day in any nation with the rule of law.

However, in my great nation, the process is normally for the police to investigate, the district attorney or federal attorney to begin proceedings, and for the police to then initiate actions.

The "court" you reference is at the end of the process.
bluehigh
1 / 5 (2) Nov 30, 2011
Is that another of your 'guesses' that you seem to be full of Nerdyguy or do you have any referential basis for your statements that 'police .. take assets .. shut down services' in law abiding countries without a lawful recourse for the alleged culprit. Nah you don't, you are just another one of those 'yanks' with a big mouth that give decent Americans a bad name.

Nerdyguy
1 / 5 (2) Nov 30, 2011
Is that another of your 'guesses' that you seem to be full of Nerdyguy or do you have any referential basis for your statements that 'police .. take assets .. shut down services' in law abiding countries without a lawful recourse for the alleged culprit. Nah you don't, you are just another one of those 'yanks' with a big mouth that give decent Americans a bad name.



Look, bluehigh, aka Vendicar, aka kochevik, there's no guesswork involved. The actions I described are extraordinarily well-documented police actions. There's nothing in what I said that's news.

At no time did I mention anything along the lines of police agencies doing anything without a "lawful recourse". Of course, in law abiding countries there is a legal process silly boy. That's the point.

If you want some sort of basic primer in legal proceedings, you can do your own reading on your own time. But, please do try saying something intelligent in the future.
bluehigh
1 / 5 (1) Nov 30, 2011
There's nothing in what I said ..


Well, you got that much correct!

Nerdyguy
1 / 5 (1) Nov 30, 2011
Oh thats right .. in America its the 'Golden Rule'. Those that have the gold make the rules, like some amoral thugs. Oh I see ..


You're entitled to your delusional opinion, but I'm curious if you actually have the ability to even define it, let alone back it up.

Specifically, what part of the legal proceedings that were followed here, against international criminals, would include any police agency acting like an "amoral thug"?

Or do you not believe in the rule of law?
kochevnik
1 / 5 (1) Dec 01, 2011
Specifically, what part of the legal proceedings that were followed here, against international criminals, would include any police agency acting like an "amoral thug"?
What "legal proceedings?" You mean seizure without due process?
Nerdyguy
not rated yet Dec 01, 2011
Specifically, what part of the legal proceedings that were followed here, against international criminals, would include any police agency acting like an "amoral thug"?
What "legal proceedings?" You mean seizure without due process?


1) I meant legal proceedings as in "a process that was legal". You're right, another usage means a legal process in court. Sorry for the confusion. So, I was asking, what part of the entirely and fully legal process was your problem with?

2) There was no seizure without due process.
Blaspheyou
not rated yet Dec 03, 2011
If the market won't bear $115 football jerseys, so be it. That's the market speaking, and the fact that people break the law to do it is the market screaming, not just speaking. Plus, NFL owners are the greediest sob's on the planet.
Nerdyguy
not rated yet Dec 04, 2011
If the market won't bear $115 football jerseys, so be it. That's the market speaking, and the fact that people break the law to do it is the market screaming, not just speaking. Plus, NFL owners are the greediest sob's on the planet.


Such ludicrous anarchist drivel is essentially the reason that the government is wasting money on this crap. If people like you would grow up, get a clue, learn some morals, and realize you're not "owed" anything for free, we wouldn't have these clowns running around like chickens with their heads cut off.
FrankHerbert
0.8 / 5 (48) Dec 04, 2011
There you go again.

If people like you would grow up, get a clue, learn some morals, and realize you're not "owed" anything for free


"Someone disagrees with me so they must be a naive child!"

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