Not many will view Friday's partial solar eclipse

November 21, 2011

(AP) -- The moon will appear to take a nibble out of the sun on Friday, a spectacle that will be visible from only a small sliver of the world.

It'll be the fourth and last partial solar eclipse of the year. Weather permitting, people in New Zealand, and parts of South Africa may glimpse the .

At its peak, 90 percent of the sun will be blocked over .

If you're not within viewing range, don't fret. Next May, an annular, or ring-shaped, solar eclipse promises to dazzle a larger audience since it will be visible from the western United States and eastern Asia.

Scientists urge people to wear protective glasses when viewing a solar eclipse.

Explore further: Cloud obscures annular eclipse

More information: NASA eclipse page: http://eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse.html

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