Developing unbiased measures of customer likes and dislikes

Nov 02, 2011

Companies around the world rely on various marketing strategies to make their brands more appealing to customers, and now, according to a study published in the online journal PLoS ONE, they may have an actual physiological method they can use to test their success.

Many rely on self-reporting by consumers, which can be biased and unreliable. To combat these shortcomings, the authors of the recent work, led by Peter Walla of University of Newcastle in Australia, showed that the brains' emotional and motivational reaction accurately reflect whether a study subject likes or dislikes a particular brand.

Strikingly, the brains' reaction is measured without requiring any explicit verbal responses. "Self-reported measures of emotion are cognitively polluted", says Dr. Walla, and based on these results, the authors suggest that companies may be able to improve their product development by introducing such measures.

Explore further: Launching a new brand: Is partnering with a popular brand a good idea?

More information: Walla P, Brenner G, Koller M (2011) Objective Measures of Emotion Related to Brand Attitude: A New Way to Quantify Emotion-Related Aspects Relevant to Marketing. PLoS ONE 6(11): e26782. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0026782

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

A 'brand' new world: Attachment runs thicker than money

Nov 04, 2010

Can you forge an emotional bond with a brand so strong that, if forced to buy a competitor's product, you suffer separation anxiety? According to a new study from the USC Marshall School of Business, the answer is yes. In ...

MRI shows brains respond better to name brands

Nov 28, 2006

Your brain may be determining what car you buy before you've even taken a test drive. A new study gauging the brain's response to product branding has found that strong brands elicit strong activity in our brains. The findings ...

When will a message of social responsibility backfire?

Jul 14, 2011

Consumers don't react positively to all messages of corporate social responsibility, according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research. The message needs to line up with consumers' mindsets and understanding of the ...

Recommended for you

Professor analyzes role of trade sanctions against Iran

17 hours ago

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu addressed Congress on Tuesday as about 50 Democratic lawmakers threatened to boycott the address, offering the latest and one of the most clear microcosms of the debate about Iran's ...

Think twice about investing in own company

21 hours ago

Employees whose retirement plan is invested in stock of the company where they work do not pull out money as the firms approach financial distress, a recently released, but yet to be published paper, co-authored ...

When performance comparisons spur risky behavior

Mar 02, 2015

When you're at work, there are two types of people you compete with: People with similar responsibilities at your own company, and rivals with similar duties at other companies. How do those different flavors ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

hush1
not rated yet Nov 02, 2011
"Self-reported measures of emotion are cognitively polluted" - Peter

The filters for 'pollution' are absolute.
Not.
The bias to sell is a bias, is it not?

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.