TRMM Satellite sees Tropical Storm Keila form in the Arabian Sea

Nov 02, 2011
This 3-D image from the TRMM satellite was captured on Nov. 2, 2011 at 0350 UTC (11:50 p.m. EDT, Nov. 1). Thunderstorms within Keila were reaching to heights of almost 17km (~10.6 miles). Credit: Credit: SSAI/NASA, Hal Pierce

The TRMM satellite passed directly above a recently formed tropical cyclone in the Arabian Sea on November 2, 2011 at 0350 UTC (11:50 p.m. EDT, Nov. 1). An analysis of rainfall was done using TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments. TRMM data showed that rainfall rates with tropical storm Keila ranged from light to moderate along the south-eastern coast of Oman. Moderate to heavy rainfall was revealed to be spiraling into Keila's center of circulation in the Arabian Sea near the southeastern coast of Oman.

TRMM Precipitation Radar data was used to create a 3-D vertical structure of Tropical Storm Keila. It showed that a few towers near Keila's center were reaching heights of about 13 km (~8.1 miles). Powerful storms were shown in a large feeder band converging into Kelia from the Arabian Sea.

At 1500 UTC (11 a.m. EDT) today, Nov. 2, Tropical Storm Keila had near 35 knots (40 mph). Keila's center was over the Yemen coast and about 630 nautical miles northeast of Aden, Yemen. It was near 17.0 North and 54.9 East. Although Keila was moving at 5 knots (6 mph) to the northeast, a building mid-level ridge (elongated area) of high pressure is building to the north of the storm, and will re-route it to the west-southwest.

Also this morning, infrared data from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on NASA's Aqua satellite saw a burst of convection (developing thunderstorms) around the center of circulation and a band of thunderstorms to the south of the center.

Keila is expected to weaken a little as it continues to interact with the coastline, but slowly intensify tomorrow or Friday because of warm .

Keila made landfall early today (Nov. 2) in Oman, and is forecast to track to the west-southwest along the Oman and Yemen coastlines.

Explore further: Lightning plus volcanic ash make glass

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

NASA caught Tropical Storm Rina forming, strengthening

Oct 24, 2011

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite called "TRMM" and NASA's Aqua satellite captured radar and temperature data that showed Tropical Storm Rina forming in the western Caribbean Sea yesterday. ...

Recommended for you

Lightning plus volcanic ash make glass

5 hours ago

In their open-access paper for Geology, Kimberly Genareau and colleagues propose, for the first time, a mechanism for the generation of glass spherules in geologic deposits through the occurrence of volcan ...

A new level of earthquake understanding

10 hours ago

As everyone who lives in the San Francisco Bay Area knows, the Earth moves under our feet. But what about the stresses that cause earthquakes? How much is known about them? Until now, our understanding of ...

Combined Arctic ice observations show decades of loss

13 hours ago

It's no surprise that Arctic sea ice is thinning. What is new is just how long, how steadily, and how much it has declined. University of Washington researchers compiled modern and historic measurements to ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.