Sweet success: First recorded wild breeding from captive-bred Regent Honeyeater

Nov 24, 2011
Regent Honeyeater (Anthochaera phrygia). Photo taken by Dean Ingwersen

(PhysOrg.com) -- A captive-bred Regent Honeyeater (Anthochaera phrygia) has given efforts to save the species in Victoria a boost by successfully raising young in the wild.

Department of Sustainability and Environment (DSE) Senior Biodiversity Officer, Glen Johnson said: “The captive bred female bird went ‘off the radar’ for over a year before it turned up on a nest in September with a mate in the Chiltern area of North-eastern Victoria.”

“One juvenile was raised by the pair and it represents a vital addition to the gene pool of this threatened species,” Mr Johnson said.

“This first recorded successful rearing of young by a captive-bred bird in the wild is exactly what the National Regent Honeyeater Recovery Program has been hoping to achieve.”

Birds Australia National Regent Honeyeater Recovery Co-ordinator, Dean Ingwersen said: “This great result highlights the value of the national captive breeding program coordinated by Taronga Zoo as well as the importance of the ongoing monitoring program that aims to increase our understanding of Regent Honeyeater movements and behaviour.”

“For 14 months we couldn’t find this bird, so to have it deliver such an important boost to this species in Victoria is even more exciting,” Mr Ingwersen said.

“We will continue the monitoring program in the hope of finding other captive-bred birds with wild birds.”

“There’s so much we are still learning about Regent Honeyeater movements and habitat requirements and each detailed sighting report adds to our knowledge.”

The Regent Honeyeater (Anthochaera phrygia) is listed as 'Threatened' under the Flora and Fauna Guarantee (FFG) Act.

Explore further: Alternate mechanism of species formation picks up support, thanks to a South American ant

Provided by Victoria University

not rated yet
add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Hybrid possum gives endangered species a chance

May 26, 2011

Australian researchers have successfully bred two genetically distinct Mountain Pygmy-possums, playing a major role in preventing the endangered population in the Victorian Alpine region from further decline.

A genetic lift puts perch back in the swim

Nov 08, 2011

Four species of freshwater native fish brought to the brink of extinction by drought are being re-released into the lower Murray wetlands, and thanks to Flinders University research, they have an improved ...

Wrens eavesdrop on the neighbors

Aug 17, 2011

Superb fairy-wrens eavesdrop, learn to understand and react to the danger calls of other bird species that live nearby, according to new research published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. ...

Researchers reveal baby-killer birds

Oct 20, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- The mysterious behaviour of female Eclectus parrots killing their sons immediately after they hatch has been unravelled by a team of researchers from the Australian National University.

Recommended for you

Orb-weaving spiders living in urban areas may be larger

Aug 20, 2014

A common orb-weaving spider may grow larger and have an increased ability to reproduce when living in urban areas, according to a study published August 20, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Eli ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

epsi00
not rated yet Nov 24, 2011
Bravo.