Seoul roads to be repaved for radioactivity

Nov 06, 2011

Two sections of road in the South Korean capital Seoul are to be repaved after they were found to be radioactive, officials said Saturday.

Alarmed by the nuclear disaster in northeastern Japan in March this year, some South Koreans bought Geiger counters and use them to survey their own neighbourhoods.

A resident in northeastern Seoul's Nowon area reported to authorities this week that she had found high levels of radioactivity on the road near her apartment, district official Kim Se-Yul told AFP.

Checks by the local authority found 10 times higher than normal in two segments of the roadway, he said, but the amounts involved posed limited health risks.

"The source of radioactivity has apparently nothing to do with the ," he added.

According to the Korea Institute of an hour-long exposure to the road every day for an entire year would amount to less than half the annual permissible dose of radiation.

Where the radioactivity is coming from remains unconfirmed but experts believe it is from materials added to asphalt when the roads were repaired in 2000, the Joongang Daily said.

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Nerdyguy
5 / 5 (1) Nov 06, 2011
HOW FEAR OVERRULES INTELLIGENCE:

Two sections of road in the South Korean capital Seoul are to be repaved after they were found to be radioactive, officials said Saturday.

DESPITE THE FACT THAT:

According to the Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety an hour-long exposure to the road every day for an entire year would amount to less than half the annual permissible dose of radiation.

AND

Where the radioactivity is coming from remains unconfirmed

In summary: we're not sure where the danger comes from, and we know that there is almost no danger at all unless you sleep directly on the street. So, of course we will repave it.

These are the precise tactics used by fear-mongers in the ridiculous efforts to kill nuclear power generation.
wwqq
not rated yet Nov 06, 2011
The world is a radioactive place, some spots more so than others.

Asphalt is much too soft to use alone as pavement. Asphalt is only the binder; it has to be mixed with various filler materials to get the desired properties(e.g. hard-wearing, low noise, withstand heavy trucks and so on).

This filler material can be almost anything depending on the desired properties. It can contain natural sand or gravel, it can contain crushed stone from a quarry or blasting fragments from road excavation that have been further crushed and sieved into appropriate sizes, it can be 'recycled'(downcycled, really) glass bottles that have been crushed, it can be phosphygypsum(leftover from phosphate mining), it can be coal fly ash, it can be a lot of things.

Phosphogypsum is a likely candidate, it can sometimes contain enough uranium(~100 ppm or more) that it was practical to leach it for uranium in the 70's and 80's when uranium was more expensive than it is today