Seagate intros second-generation solid state hybrid drive

Nov 29, 2011
Seagate intros second-generation solid state hybrid drive
Seagate Momentus XT 750GB solid state hybrid drive, the world's fastest hard drive for laptop PCs.

Seagate is now shipping the second generation of Momentus XT, its groundbreaking solid state hybrid drive for consumer and commercial laptops and the company’s fastest drive ever for personal computers. With a simple drive upgrade, users can boost boot-up speed and overall performance to turbo-charge their laptop PC. Seven original equipment manufacturers are gearing up to ship laptops powered by the Momentus XT drive.

Powering the Momentus XT drive are ’s Adaptive Memory and FAST Factor technologies. Adaptive Memory technology works by identifying data usage patterns, and then moving the most frequently retrieved information to solid state memory for faster access. Adaptive Memory effectively tailors hard drive performance to each user and the applications they use. FAST Factor technology blends the strengths of SSDs and hard disk drives for faster access to applications, quicker bootup and higher overall system speed.

“Laptop users want faster access to all of their content, from gaming, music and video to spreadsheets and documents, creating strong demand for the highest performance,” said Scott Horn, vice president of Worldwide Marketing at Seagate. “Seagate is excited to answer this need with a second-generation Momentus XT drive that delivers (SSD) speed, greater storage capacity and easy installation at an affordable price.”

The Momentus XT drive is nearly 70 percent faster than the prior Momentus drive version and up to three times faster than a traditional hard disk drive while providing 750GB of storage capacity. The Momentus XT hard drive’s Serial ATA 6Gb/second interface and 8 gigabytes of Single Level Cell NAND flash double the interface and NAND read-write speed of the previous generation. The all-in-one design of Momentus XT drive makes installation and upgrading simple and easy for any or desktop computer and with any operating system.

The Momentus XT drive is now shipping in volume worldwide. Manufacturer’s Suggesting Retail Pricing (MSRP) for Momentus XT 750GB is $245.

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Nik_2213
not rated yet Nov 29, 2011
Given flash memory's re-write limits, I wonder what warranty they'll offer-- And if there's a way to bypass the RAM when it starts to glitch.
El_Nose
not rated yet Nov 29, 2011
HA, no way to bypass ram - that is a system architecture issue not to be solved with installing a hard drive -- but think about your question -- using this as RAM would destroy the drive in a year or so -- since you already understand the R.W limit... paging in an out several times per second

the R/W limits are well outside of what a active person would need in 10 yrs of usage -- we are talking about thousands of read writes per bit -- the OS is going to be hit the heaviest right but and it gets loaded into RAM
FrankHerbert
1 / 5 (4) Nov 29, 2011
I've heard people claim that Windows 7 requires SOME paging even if you have an enormous amount of RAM. Why is this? If someone has 8gb of RAM but Windows still wants a ~100mb pagefile, why would windows still require someone with 16gb of RAM to have a pagefile?

I know you can tell it not to create one, but I've heard from people with more documented experience than me that this isn't a good idea, though they are never able to explain why. Is there a reason, or is this just folksy computer tech knowledge?
CHollman82
3 / 5 (4) Nov 29, 2011
I've heard people claim that Windows 7 requires SOME paging even if you have an enormous amount of RAM. Why is this? If someone has 8gb of RAM but Windows still wants a ~100mb pagefile, why would windows still require someone with 16gb of RAM to have a pagefile?

I know you can tell it not to create one, but I've heard from people with more documented experience than me that this isn't a good idea, though they are never able to explain why. Is there a reason, or is this just folksy computer tech knowledge?


There is no benefit to disabling it, windows won't page in use applications anyway, but if you have tons of ram it doesn't necessarily hurt to do so either... generally if you have way more ram than you ever use the page file doesn't matter, enabled or not.
CHollman82
3 / 5 (4) Nov 29, 2011
One good reason to leave the page file in tact though is that some applications require it, just because they are written with the assumption that it is there and will make use of it just because.
FrankHerbert
1 / 5 (4) Nov 29, 2011
Oh. Thanks!
Jonseer
1 / 5 (1) Nov 29, 2011
I love the graphic accompanying the article.

Couldn't they find a graphic of a solid state drive, instead of just lazily settling for the drive type solid state drives seek to replace?
dirk_bruere
not rated yet Nov 29, 2011
One answer would be to put the pagefile on the HDD rather than SSD part of the drive - if that is possible
Silan
not rated yet Nov 30, 2011
I love the graphic accompanying the article.

Couldn't they find a graphic of a solid state drive, instead of just lazily settling for the drive type solid state drives seek to replace?


That is a graphic of the drive, it's a flash assisted hybrid which apparently boots and performs like an Solid State Drive.
Seagate are giving 5 years warranty on the drive.
Sonhouse
not rated yet Nov 30, 2011
My need for faster drives stems from my music recording system, for instance, I use Kontakt which uses gigabytes of sound file samples to be used with a keyboard to simulate a piano really well, for instance, but the HD/CPU starts to crash if too many notes are played at once. So if I were to use this hybrid and constantly pulling files from the HD would that lower the life of the system because of the R/W cycle time problem?
El_Nose
1 / 5 (1) Nov 30, 2011
in a word -- yes Sonhouse
but in your lifetime -- no

Unforunately you are not loading all of those sample files into ram where you read one time per program opening - but you pull them into ram as needed -- so when you are playing a song in the Key of say G major there is not need to read file associated with F but you will probably be using F# a lot along with B,D,E which you will constantly be hitting.
SemiNerd
not rated yet Dec 01, 2011
Given flash memory's re-write limits, I wonder what warranty they'll offer-- And if there's a way to bypass the RAM when it starts to glitch.

The much ballyhooed re-write limits on flash have to be taken into context. Nearly all flash memory can easily be rewritten on the order of 100,000 times. That's about 100 times a day for 3 years, day in and day out. The likelihood that any flash cell will be rewritten more than a few times a day is low, because the drive is storing most recently used data. Its not being used for paging, or any other rapid turnover memory.

Its likely than 99.9% of the accesses in this case are reads, which flash cells can do essentially forever.