Two rhino species bite the dust: Red List

Nov 10, 2011
A warden watches a rhinoceros in South Africa in 2004. Several species of rhino have been poached into extinction or to the point of no return, according to an update of the Red List of Threatened Species, the gold standard for animal and plant conservation.

Several species of rhino have been poached into extinction or to the point of no return, according to an update of the Red List of Threatened Species, the gold standard for animal and plant conservation.

All told, a quarter of all assessed are at risk of extinction, the International Union for the (IUCN), which compiles the list, said on Thursday.

About a third of the 61,900 now catalogued by the IUCN are classified as "vulnerable," "endangered," "critically endangered," or extinct, with some groups, such as amphibians and reptiles, in particularly .

Rhinoceros have been hit especially hard in recent years. Their fearsome horns -- prized for dagger handles in the Middle East and in east Asia -- can fetch hundreds of thousands of dollars on the black market.

The new assessment shows that a subspecies of the western black rhino (Diceros bicornis longipes) native to western Africa is now extinct, joining a long list of creatures -- from the to the Arabian gazelle -- that no longer stride the planet.

Central Africa's northern white rhino (Ceratotherium simum cottoni) is listed as "possibly extinct in the wild", while the Javan rhino (Rhinoceros sondaicus) is making a last stand after the remaining specimen of its Vietnamese counterpart was killed by last year.

"Human beings are stewards of the earth and we are responsible for protecting the species that share our environment," Simon Stuart, head of the IUCN Species Survival Commission, said in a statement.

"In the case of both the western black and the northern white rhinos the situation could have had very different results if suggested had been implemented."

There were a few slivers of good news showing that species can be prevented from slipping into oblivion.

The southern white rhino subspecies (Ceratotherium simum simum) is back from the brink, its numbers up from 100 at the end of the 19th century to some 20,000 today.

Central Asia's Przewalski's horse (Equus ferus), meanwhile, has moved from a status of critically endangered to endangered.

"We have the knowledge that conservation works if executed in a timely manner," said Jane Smart, the Global Species Programme director.

The general trend, however, is an acceleration in extinction across a wide spectrum of fauna and flora. Indeed, many scientists say Earth is on the edge of a so-called great extinction event, only the sixth in half-a-billion years.

Some groups are especially vulnerable. In Madagascar, home to a dazzlingly rich diversity of life, an alarming 40 percent of reptiles are threatened.

Plant species are disappearing too. Such was the fate of the Chinese water fir (Glyptostrobus pensilis), once common in China but now apparently extinct in the wild due to habitat loss.

The new classification also recognises new species, including 26 recently discovered amphibians such as the blessed poison frog (Ranitomeya benedicta) and the summers' poison frog (Ranitomeya summersi).

Both are threatened by habitat loss and harvesting for the international pet trade.

"The world is full of marvelous species that are rapidly moving towards becoming things of myth and legend," said the IUCN's Jean-Christophe Vie.

Explore further: Poachers threaten new slaughter of South African elephants

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Rhino poached to extinction in Vietnam: WWF

Oct 25, 2011

A critically endangered species of rhino has been poached to extinction in Vietnam, wildlife groups said Tuesday after the country's last Javan rhino was found dead with its horn hacked off.

Extinction alert issued for 800 species

Dec 13, 2005

Conservation and environmental groups have compiled a list of nearly 800 species they say face imminent extinction. Most of the threatened species are found mainly in tropical areas, the BBC reported Tuesday.

Recommended for you

Japan wraps up Pacific whale hunt

19 hours ago

Japan announced Tuesday that it had wrapped up a whale hunt in the Pacific, the second campaign since the UN's top court ordered Tokyo to halt a separate slaughter in the Antarctic.

Algae under threat from invasive fish

20 hours ago

Tropical fish invading temperate waters warmed as a result of climate change are overgrazing algae, posing a threat to biodiversity and some marine-based industries.

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Pirouette
not rated yet Nov 12, 2011
Why aren't the poachers reeducated as they're caught? Or is poaching too lucrative a crime that they would only go back to it when released?
It just goes to prove that some humans have no conscience.
bazzah
not rated yet Nov 13, 2011
The poachers and illegal market are devastating on these animals!
I was just researching the dwindling numbers of Big Horn Sheep here in California for a blog post, and these animals are endangered due to human presence. The fact that humans can wipe out a species by being in the area is frighting, so it is outrageous that there are people ACTIVELY poaching these endangered animals.

I agree that education is a must, however it is only a small part of the puzzle. I just hope that the conservation efforts aren't too little, too late.