Most oil emptied from stricken New Zealand ship

Nov 14, 2011
People look at a container from the stricken ship 'Rena' in the water at Mount Maunganui near Tauranga in October 2011. Salvage crews have pumped almost all the oil from a container ship that ran aground on a New Zealand reef and caused the country's worst maritime pollution disaster, authorities said Monday.

Salvage crews have pumped almost all the oil from a container ship that ran aground on a New Zealand reef and caused the country's worst maritime pollution disaster, authorities said Monday.

Maritime New Zealand (MNZ) said only about 60 tonnes remained on the Rena and the focus of the salvage operation had shifted to removing from the stricken vessel.

"While getting the bulk of the oil off the Rena is a significant milestone, our job isn’t done yet," MNZ on-site commander Mick Courtnell said.

The Liberian-flagged ship was carrying 1,700 tonnes of oil when it ploughed into a reef on October 5, releasing about 350 tonnes into the North Island's pristine Bay of Plenty.

The resulting oil slick killed about 1,300 birds and fouled beaches in the popular tourist area with black sludge.

The Rena remains stranded on the reef with huge cracks in its hull and Matthew Watson, a spokesman for the salvage company working on the ship, said removing 1,200-plus containers from the badly listing vessel would take a long time.

"Getting those containers off is going to be a long, awkward, difficult process in itself, we're talking about months not weeks," he told Radio .

"Then of course, beyond that, we're looking at how to try and get the Rena off the reef. That's assuming she doesn't break up in weather conditions in the interim."

The Rena's Filipino captain and second officer been charged with operating a vessel in a manner causing unnecessary danger or risk and discharging harmful substances.

New Zealand's Environment Minister Nick Smith has claimed the Rena hit the Astrolabe Reef while taking a short cut to reach port.

Explore further: Deforestation could intensify climate change in Congo Basin by half

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New break up fears for stricken N. Z. ship

Nov 02, 2011

Officers from a ship stuck on a New Zealand reef faced fresh charges Wednesday as fears were raised the vessel was close to breaking up and could spill more oil, worsening the environmental disaster.

More oil spills from stricken New Zealand ship

Oct 18, 2011

Fresh oil leaked from a container ship stuck on a New Zealand reef Tuesday, as bad weather halted both salvage work on the vessel and a massive pollution clean up on the coast.

Oil-slick ship at risk of breaking up: NZealand PM

Oct 12, 2011

Fears grew Wednesday that a ship stuck on a New Zealand reef may break up and release a new tide of oil, as its captain was charged over the nation's worst maritime pollution disaster.

Recommended for you

Predicting bioavailable cadmium levels in soils

14 hours ago

New Zealand's pastoral landscapes are some of the loveliest in the world, but they also contain a hidden threat. Many of the country's pasture soils have become enriched in cadmium. Grasses take up this toxic heavy metal, ...

Oil drilling possible 'trigger' for deadly Italy quakes

18 hours ago

Italy's Emilia-Romagna region on Tuesday suspended new drilling as it published a report that warned that hydrocarbon exploitation may have acted as a "trigger" in twin earthquakes that killed 26 people in ...

Snow is largely a no-show for Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race

18 hours ago

On March 1, 65 mushers and their teams of dogs left Anchorage, Alaska, on a quest to win the Iditarod—a race covering 1,000 miles of mountain ranges, frozen rivers, dense forest, tundra and coastline. According ...

UN weather agency warns of 'El Nino' this year

18 hours ago

The UN weather agency Tuesday warned there was a good chance of an "El Nino" climate phenomenon in the Pacific Ocean this year, bringing droughts and heavy rainfall to the rest of the world.

Study shows less snowpack will harm ecosystem

19 hours ago

(Phys.org) —A new study by CAS Professor of Biology Pamela Templer shows that milder winters can have a negative impact both on trees and on the water quality of nearby aquatic ecosystems, far into the warm growing season.

User comments : 0

More news stories

UN weather agency warns of 'El Nino' this year

The UN weather agency Tuesday warned there was a good chance of an "El Nino" climate phenomenon in the Pacific Ocean this year, bringing droughts and heavy rainfall to the rest of the world.

Patent talk: Google sharpens contact lens vision

(Phys.org) —A report from Patent Bolt brings us one step closer to what Google may have in mind in developing smart contact lenses. According to the discussion Google is interested in the concept of contact ...

Wireless industry makes anti-theft commitment

A trade group for wireless providers said Tuesday that the biggest mobile device manufacturers and carriers will soon put anti-theft tools on the gadgets to try to deter rampant smartphone theft.