Mountains limited spread of fallout from Fukushima

Nov 14, 2011 By MALCOLM RITTER , AP Science Writer

A map of radioactive contamination across Japan from the Fukushima power plant disaster confirms high levels in eastern and northeastern areas but finds much lower levels in the western part of the country, thanks to mountain ranges, researchers say.

The mountains sheltered northwestern and western parts of Japan as radioactive cesium-137 emerged from the power plant and blew downwind, the scientists said.

Cesium-137 is just one of the that came out of the plant, but researchers focused on that because it's particularly worrisome. It lasts for decades in soils, emitting radiation and potentially contaminating crops and other agricultural products.

The research, published online Monday by the , shows estimated levels of contamination. It did not investigate implications for health.

The researchers, from Japan, Norway and the United States, said the levels they estimated would severely restrict food production in eastern Fukushima Prefecture and hinder agriculture in neighboring provinces. That outcome is already recognized in Japan, where regulators monitor food products from those areas for contamination before they are cleared for shipment.

The Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, 140 miles (225 kilometers) northeast of Tokyo, was heavily damaged in March when it was swamped by a tsunami triggered by an earthquake.

A second report, from a separate group of Japanese scientists, investigated levels of , iodine and on the surface in east-central Japan. Such materials are airborne after a and fall to the ground when it rains. While the power plant incident began on March 11, the study linked ground contamination in the Fukushima prefecture to a March 15 rainfall, and contamination in Tokyo and some other areas to a March 21 rain.

Soil contamination in Tokyo has already made officials ban shipment of tea leaves grown there, and some elementary schools in Tokyo and nearby have taken decontamination steps like removing topsoil. In addition, there is growing concern about radioactive "hotspots" found in Tokyo and elsewhere outside Fukushima. The Japanese government has taken responsibility for decontamination.

Explore further: NASA's infrared data shows newborn Tropical Storm Marie came together

More information: “Cesium-137 deposition and contamination of Japanese soils due to the Fukushima nuclear accident,” by Teppei J. Yasunari et al. PNAS (2011).

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Scottingham
2.5 / 5 (2) Nov 14, 2011
Yipes...so they can't use that land for farming now. What about factories?

Paradoxically, what about more nuclear plants? Since the area is already not exactly prime for growing crops, why not use it to help Japan's energy problem. Obviously built with the lessons learned from the quake/tsunami.
antialias_physorg
not rated yet Nov 15, 2011
Nuclear power plants require massive amounts of water for cooling/steam production. Building them in the mountains is usually not an option.

Also note that the mountains in Japan are the results of volcanic action. Building stuff there instead of along the coast means you're just exchanging one set of dangers for another. I'm pretty sure you could make something more easily tsunami-proof than volcano-proof.

Losing farm land is a massive problem for Japan - 80% of the land not being suitable for farming in the first place.
It's not like in the US or Russia where you can just throw away a couple of hundred square kilometers as contaminated and never think twice about it.