Researchers find link between personality and credit scores

Nov 02, 2011

The use of credit scores as employment screening tools is a hotly debated topic. According to a 2010 poll by the Society for Human Resource Management, 60 percent of surveyed employers conducted credit checks for some or all candidates as part of the hiring process.

With in the United States at double digits, losing a career opportunity has a potentially higher impact than nearly ever before, while the nationwide wave of simultaneously makes it more likely for an individual to have a black mark on their record. In an upcoming study to be published in the , researchers from LSU, Texas Tech University and Northern Illinois University have showcased the link between credit ratings and an individual's personality, and shown no connection between poor and theft.

First, the authors found a link between credit scores and .

"With regards to personality and credit – it makes sense that conscientiousness is related to good credit, but what was really interesting was that agreeableness was negatively related to your credit score," said Jeremy Bernerth, assistant professor in LSU's E. J. Ourso College of Business Rucks Department of Management. "That suggests easy-going individuals actually have worse credit scores than disagreeable and rude individuals. This suggests that agreeable individuals might get themselves in trouble by co-signing loans for friends or family or taking out additional credit cards at the suggestion of store clerks."

However, contrary to what many employers consider common knowledge and practice, the researchers found no correlation between poor credit scores and bad behavior on the job.

"It was telling that poor credit scores were not correlated to theft and other deviant types of work behaviors," said Bernerth. "Most companies attempt to justify the use of credit scores because they think such employees will end up stealing, but our research suggests that might not be the case."

Explore further: Startups should seek quality—not quantity—in partnerships, study finds

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

People more likely to overestimate their credit quality

Jun 02, 2008

A new study published in the Journal of Consumer Affairs examined consumers' self-assessments of their credit rating and found that respondents were more likely to believe they had average or above average credit and those ...

Credit card hacker sentenced to 10 years in prison

Jul 23, 2011

Rogelio Hackett, who stole more than half a million credit card numbers used to rack up nearly $40 million in illicit debt, was sentenced Friday to 10 years in prison and fined $100,000.

All credit ratings not created equal

Sep 15, 2011

At least one of the "Big Three" credit ratings agencies exaggerated credit scores of private debt compared to public bonds during the last 30 years, according to a new study by researchers from Rice University, American University ...

Recommended for you

Insider trading study shows stronger enforcement

Oct 23, 2014

The first major study of the enforcement of Australia's insider trading laws has shown the number of insider trading cases brought by the Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC) is increasing, ...

The unexpected benefits of adjustable rate mortgages

Oct 22, 2014

Using loan level data matched to consumer credit records, researchers have been able to determine that a reduction in mortgage payments of as little as $150 a month spurred a reduction in mortgage defaults and an increase ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Nerdyguy
not rated yet Nov 02, 2011
"Researchers find link between personality and credit scores"

Next up from this brilliant group:

"Researchers find that pant size is correlated to waist size"