Japan CO2 emissions see first rise in three years

Nov 18, 2011
Japan's emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) due to energy generation rose 4.4 percent to 1.12 billion tonnes in the year to March, marking the first annual rise in three years.

Japan's emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) due to energy generation rose 4.4 percent to 1.12 billion tonnes in the year to March, marking the first annual rise in three years, the government said Friday.

The gain reflected a 4 percent rise in in the fiscal year on the back of a recovery in the domestic economy and unusually hot summer and , the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry said.

It was the first annual rise in the use of energy in six years, the ministry said in an annual report on energy supply and demand.

CO2 emissions peaked in the 2007-2008 fiscal year at 1.22 billion tonnes but declined 6.6 percent and 5.6 percent in the following two years, the ministry said.

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FMA
2 / 5 (4) Nov 18, 2011
Some percentage of the rise are to the shut down of nuclear plant and re-open of the coal fire plant perhaps.
rwinners
3 / 5 (2) Nov 19, 2011
Burning more coal to make up for the loss of all that nuclear energy?

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