IEA backs renewable energy

Nov 23, 2011
Renewable energy resources are growing very fast but countries still must be vigilant to ensure that they continue to expand, the International Energy Agency said Wednesday.

Renewable energy resources are growing very fast but countries still must be vigilant to ensure that they continue to expand, the International Energy Agency said Wednesday.

The IEA, the energy advisory body to the , said is a key element in meeting increasing demand and balancing environmental concerns.

IEA Executive Director Maria van der Hoeven said in a statement that renewables must be stepped up, "especially given the world’s increasing appetite for energy and the need to meet this demand more efficiently and with low-carbon energy sources."

Launching a new book, 'Deploying Renewables 2011: Best and Future Policy Practice,' van der Hoeven said it showed the dangers of relying on traditional energy sources.

"As the IEA’s analysis has shown, without an urgent and radical change of policy direction, the world will lock itself into an insecure, inefficient and high-carbon energy system," she said.

"Renewables already play a central role in fostering sustainability and energy security, and their significance will only grow in the coming decades.

"Against this backdrop, Deploying Renewables 2011 provides a major review of renewable markets and policies at this critical juncture."

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3432682
1.7 / 5 (6) Nov 23, 2011
Call me when there is something financially feasible, constant, and sizable. Until then, stop pretending.
djr
4 / 5 (4) Nov 23, 2011
"Until then, stop pretending." 343 - I get that you have no vision - and don't understand that alternatives are the future in terms world energy supplies. I could point you to this article on Brazil's emerging wind market http://www.energy...r-source to demonstrate that these technologies are maturing - and that the future is exciting, and emerging before our eyes. What concerns me is your need to always jump on articles by people who do have vision - and to always spread dispariging comments. It almost seems that you are afraid of the neat changes that so many of us are excited by. Not to mention the problems we are facing in terms of global warming - and the need we have for these emerging technologies as we figure out how to deal with a very changing climate...
StarGazer2011
1 / 5 (4) Nov 24, 2011
if we could power the world with windmills, why did we abandon them in favor of coal and oil? Renewables are a pipe dream for people who may have 'vision' but no maths skills.
djr
5 / 5 (2) Nov 24, 2011
"Renewables are a pipe dream for people who may have 'vision' but no maths skills." I guess your math skills are better than the IEA's. Check out some of the numbers in these reports StarGazer.http://cleantechn...=Feed%3A Coal is still cheaper - but the numbers are converging - and it will not be too long before solar is the cheaper (maybe 5 years). Do you honestly compare the old windmills of say Holland - with today's new wind turbines? Scotland is hoping to produce 100% of it's electricity with renewables by 2020 - how is that math StarGazer? http://www.thecli...by-2020/
djr
5 / 5 (3) Nov 24, 2011
Stargazer - check out the levelized cost of electricity in this report - showing wind to be below coal, and nuclear - still above gas - but the curve is still headed down. http://www.ground...ion.html
MarkyMark
4.5 / 5 (2) Nov 24, 2011
if we could power the world with windmills, why did we abandon them in favor of coal and oil? Renewables are a pipe dream for people who may have 'vision' but no maths skills.

Perhaps because coal and oil companies have more cash and more senitors in there pockets, and of course green tech is still being developed.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (1) Nov 24, 2011
Not to mention the problems we are facing in terms of global warming - and the need we have for these emerging technologies as we figure out how to deal with a very changing climate...

Well, admittedly it IS easier to put one's head in the sand and pretend the world is unchanging. No global warming down there, either.

if we could power the world with windmills, why did we abandon them in favor of coal and oil?

Because coal and oil were, at one point, cheaper*. And at that point we also didn't see (or didn't care) that using these technologies has drawbacks which need to be paid for by future generations. Unfortunately that 'future generation' is ours.

*And can be transported and stored - which wind energy back then could not. Even today the storage part is difficult and largely unsolved.
Vendicar_Decarian
3 / 5 (4) Nov 24, 2011
Since we could feed the world with hunting and gathering, why did we need to abandon them in favor of farming?

Times change Star Tard. Those people and those cultures who refuse to do so rapidly become extinct.

"if we could power the world with windmills, why did we abandon them in favor of coal and oil?" - StarTard
Vendicar_Decarian
3 / 5 (4) Nov 24, 2011
Wind and solar are all of those things.

Odd how you place money efficiency above material efficiency.

Didn't your mommie ever tell you that money grubbers are invariably worthless, morally and intellectualy hollow, losers?

"Call me when there is something financially feasible, constant, and sizable." - 343