No extraordinary effects from microwave and mobile phone heating

Nov 15, 2011

The effect of microwave heating and cell phone radiation on sample material is no different than a temperature increase, according to scientists from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, in Tempe, as published in a recent issue of EPJ B.

Abidah Khalife, Ullas Pathak and Ranko Richert attempted for the first time to systematically quantify the difference between microwave-induced heating and conventional heating using a hotplate or an oil-bath, with thin liquid samples. The authors measured molecular mobility and reactivity changes induced by electric fields in these samples, which can be gauged by what is known as configurational temperature.

By conducting experiments at varying field frequencies and sample thicknesses, they realised that thin samples exposed to low-frequency electric field heating can have a considerably higher mobility and reactivity than samples exposed to standard heating, even if they are at the exact same sample temperature. They also found that at frequencies exceeding several megahertz and for samples thicker than one millimetre, the type of heating used does not have a significant impact on the level of molecular mobility and reactivity, which is mainly dependent on the sample temperature. In effect, the configurational temperatures will only be marginally higher than the real measurable temperature.

Previous studies were mostly fundamental in nature and did not establish a connection between microwaves and mobile phone heating effects. These findings imply that for heating with microwave or operating in the gigahertz frequency range, no other effect than a should be expected.

Since the results are based on averaged temperatures, future work will be required to quantify local overheating, which can, for example, occur in subjected to a microwave field, and better assess the risks linked to using both microwaves and mobile phones.

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More information: Khalife A, Pathak U, and Richert R (2011). Heating liquid dielectrics by time dependent fields. European Physical Journal B (EPJ B). 83, 429 – 435, DOI 10.1140/epjb/e2011-20599-5

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User comments : 14

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eyeyamtheufo
1.4 / 5 (9) Nov 15, 2011
I hope they aren't trying to imply mobile phones are good. The proliferation of radio waves in modern society is having very negative effects on nervous system and brains of large swaths of people. I aim to prove it.... hopefully before it's too late.

rawa1
1 / 5 (4) Nov 15, 2011
In this experiment John Kanzius decomposed the water into hydrogen and peroxide just with using of radiowaves, so I'd recommend to reconsider the microwave effects just in this direction. Peroxide radicals may cause cancer of living cells.

http://www.youtub...ycQ06a04
HurfDurf
4.4 / 5 (9) Nov 15, 2011
I think I will run an experiment to determine why there is such an overabundance of trolls, quacks, and clearly mentally ill people who post in the PhysOrg forums.
rawa1
1 / 5 (2) Nov 15, 2011
I think I will run an experiment to determine why there is such an overabundance of trolls, quacks, and clearly mentally ill people who post in the PhysOrg forums.
These experiments were replicated and published by Rustum Roy, a material scientist at Pennsylvania State University.

http://www.rustum...%201.pdf

http://amcofh.org...cle1.pdf
syhprum
2.5 / 5 (6) Nov 15, 2011
I think that cancer caused by mobile phones is a real cash cow no one is ever going to say that it has no effect only that further research is needed
ArtflDgr
1 / 5 (2) Nov 15, 2011
HurfDurf,
thanks for saving me the time of saying it..
ArtflDgr
3.3 / 5 (6) Nov 16, 2011
rawa1, HurfDurf is right...
how many watts is your cell phone putting out?
did you read the experiment in his paper?

from the paper you post for us to look at
Approximate maximum power for most of our experiments was
300 W as recorded by the output dial of the RF
generator.

and what did you say?

decomposed the water into hydrogen and peroxide just with using of radiowaves...

300 watts is a very large thing to leave out

Typical phone output is under 1 watt

be careful when you whisper, did you know that sound can damage hearing?
rawa1
1.6 / 5 (8) Nov 16, 2011
300 W means 30 ml of hydrogen per second (or so). 1 W means 0.1 ml hydrogen per second. What if I don't want any hydrogen and peroxide in my brain?
Egnite
1 / 5 (2) Nov 16, 2011
I think I will run an experiment to determine why there is such an overabundance of trolls, quacks, and clearly mentally ill people who post in the PhysOrg forums.

Thats some good trolling!

Its amazes me how anyone that doubts or have different opinions to experts like yourself are insulted rather than proven wrong. I thought it were kids that threw insults when they had nothing else to argue? Each to their own though...

As a cellphone user I find reports like this very interesting but fail to see them as proving very much since the experiment conditions are far from real life situations. I'd be far more convinced if there were reports on the long-term effects from cellphone/microwaves on our cells/DNA but they won't be released until the current experiment involving us reaches a conclusion.
no other effect than a temperature increase should be expected.

You experts will disagree here but I find this experiment not thorough enough to make such a statement!
rawa1
1.8 / 5 (6) Nov 16, 2011
I find this experiment not thorough enough to make such a statement
The problem is, the interaction of organic matter with microwaves is very complex, as the richness of microwave spectra indicates. Whereas the glycerol samples may be completely nonreactive during conditions of experiment, the longer protein or DNA molecules could suffer denaturation and/or conformal changes during this. It's all about various resonance effects during vibrations of long molecules. The water splitting with radiowaves is sorta resonance effect too.

http://www.techno...v/24331/
italba
3.7 / 5 (3) Nov 16, 2011
@rawa1: Firstly, the size of proteins or DNA is many times smaller than the cellphone waves. You can't transfer energy in that way. Try to cook an ant in a microwave oven! Second, you can't assume that with 1/30 of power you'll get 1/30 of "hydrogen or peroxide". Try to boil a full pot with a match! Third, your skin is conductive. Your brain is protected from microwave just as is protected from UV rays from sun.
Callippo
1 / 5 (1) Nov 16, 2011
Firstly, the size of proteins or DNA is many times smaller than the cellphone waves
Stretched to its full length, a single molecule of human DNA extends more than three feet.
Try to cook an ant in a microwave oven!
If it's possible to split the water molecule near radiowave antenna, why not to split the DNA molecule inside of microwaves. The size of object is not apparently the issue here.
Your brain is protected from microwave just as is protected from UV rays from sun.
How is it possible to cook the egg inside of microwave oven, after then? It even explodes there from inside. Briefly speaking, learn some physics first before starting to invent stuffs.
Callippo
3 / 5 (2) Nov 16, 2011
The schematically thinking people tend to consider the interaction of waves with material environment in the realm of of mutual resonance of waves and particles forming this material environment. They're forgetting the dual cavitation effects. For example, ultrasound waves are of low energy density, but they're still able to split the water molecules at their nodes, where high pressure plasma is formed (compare the experiments with sonofusion in this context). But the electromagnetic waves could induce a sort of nanocavitation inside of polar environment too. Actually it could be very hot topic in future physics of condensed phase, not just with respect to the very effective water splitting or application for cold fusion.
You people are of zero imagination in this point. This is the result of contemporary educational system, based on memorizing of formal equations. The fact, every of you reacts with wild downvoting of fresh ideas indicates, this system is deeply religious too.
Sepp
1 / 5 (1) Nov 17, 2011
"they realised that thin samples exposed to low-frequency electric field heating can have a considerably higher mobility and reactivity than samples exposed to standard heating, even if they are at the exact same sample temperature."

"They also found that at frequencies exceeding several megahertz and for samples thicker than one millimetre, the type of heating used does not have a significant impact on the level of molecular mobility and reactivity, which is mainly dependent on the sample temperature."

Now how thick is a cell wall again?

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