Elpida develops 1600 Mbps 4-gigabit DDR3 mobile RAM (LPDDR3)

Nov 24, 2011

Elpida Memory, Dynamic Random Access Memory ("DRAM") manufacturer, today announced that it has developed an advanced 30nm process 4-gigabit DDR3 Mobile RAMTM (LPDDR3). The new chip can achieve a high-speed data transfer rate of 1600Mbps at low operating voltage of 1.2V.

The new LPDDR3, along with the newly developed high-performance low-power consumption Wide IO Mobile RAM recently announced, enables Elpida to strongly support the development of next-generation mobile devices.

LPDDR3 achieves a data transfer rate that is twice as fast as DDR2 Mobile RAM (LPDDR2),the current leading DRAM preference for mobile devices.

Based on a per pin speed of 1600Mbps, a single LPDDR3 device has a data transfer rate of 6.4 gigabytes per second (GB/s) or 12.8GB/s in high-end mobile devices using a two-chip configuration. When compared with LPDDR2 on a same-speed basis, LPDDR3 consumes roughly 25% less power, enabling it to extend the operating time of such mobile devices as smartphones and tablet PCs.

Sample shipments of the new LPDDR3 will begin toward the end of 2011. Depending on customer demand, is expected to start in late 2012. Also, two- and four-layer stacking configurations will enable high-density 8-gigabit and 16-gigabit chips to be added the line-up of LPDDR3 products.

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Vendicar_Decarian
1 / 5 (3) Nov 24, 2011
Has there been any innovation in the American Electronics industry (what is left of it) in the last decade?