Three new elements named, including one for Copernicus

November 4, 2011

The General Assembly of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), taking place at the Institute of Physics in London, today approved the names of three new elements.

Elements 110, 111 and 112 have been named darmstadtium (Ds), roentgenium (Rg) and copernicium (Cn) respectively.

The General Assembly approved these suggestions from the Joint Working Party on the Discovery of Elements, which is a joint body of IUPAP and the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC).

Dr Robert Kirby-Harris, Chief Executive at IOP and Secretary-General of IUPAP, said, “The naming of these has been agreed in consultation with physicists around the world and we’re delighted to see them now being introduced to the Periodic Table.”

The General Assembly includes delegates from national academies and physical societies around the world. IUPAP has 60 member countries altogether.

The five day meeting, which has been running from Monday 31 October and will finish today, has included presentations from leading UK physicists, and the inauguration of IUPAP’s first female President, Professor Cecilia Jarlskog from the Division of Mathematical at Lund University in Sweden.

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4 comments

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Jaeherys
5 / 5 (1) Nov 04, 2011
Noooo!! Unununium was my favorite element to say!
Kafpauzo
5 / 5 (2) Nov 05, 2011
Don't be sad. With its old name unmade, the element has become ununununiumed.
ean
not rated yet Nov 05, 2011
Now it's an issue of great urgency to update Tom Lehrer's The Elements with these.
Vendicar_Decarian
1 / 5 (1) Nov 05, 2011
Hay... Darmstadtium is my middle name.

But it is spelled Darnsmartieishim.

Editor, please correct.

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