Invention analyzes plant diseases without leaving the field

Nov 07, 2011

Farmers and field scientists can now instantly identify diseases attacking crops and plants, thanks to a Michigan State University professor's new invention.

Syed Hashsham, professor of civil and environmental engineering, has developed the Gene-Z device, which performs using a low-cost handheld device and is operated using smartphone technology.

This new application will be unveiled at the National Plant Diagnostic Network's conference Nov. 7 at Berkeley, Calif.

The traditional approach to identifying involves collecting field samples, sending them to a laboratory and awaiting the results. During the NPDN presentation, Hashsham will demonstrate the instrument's effectiveness in correctly identifying diseases, which will speed treatments and help keep the pathogen from spreading.

To use the Gene-Z device, researchers take a swab for and transfer the sample to a microfluidic chip, which is inserted into the device. Used with an or Android-based tablet, Gene-Z will be able to identify the pathogen, its genotype and its amount in 10 to 30 minutes. MSU researchers demonstrated its effectiveness by using it to detect a new disease devastating cucumber crops in the United States.

"We've already successfully proven Gene-Z's capacity for quantifying cancer markers," Hashsham said. "With this application, we can speed the analysis of pathogens in plants, water and food with the ultimate goal of improving the safety and security of food supplies anywhere in the world."

Gene-Z is ready to be manufactured, and Hashsham is working with MSU Technologies to bring the product to market.

"This is exactly the kind of new information that we like to share with our members during our conferences," said Ray Hammerschmidt, chair of MSU's plant pathology department and NPDN regional director. "Our goal is to stay ahead of the multitude of plant pathogens and pests that threaten the world's . So when we learned of Gene-Z's potential, we were excited about having its first public plant pathogen demonstration at our conference."

Explore further: Researchers discover gene that controls melting point of cocoa butter

More information: For more information on the conference, visit ucanr.org/sites/NPDN

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