China says docking mission step to space station

Nov 18, 2011 By CHRISTOPHER BODEEN , Associated Press
In this photo released by China's Xinhua News Agency, a technician inspects the re-entry capsule of Shenzhou 8 spacecraft which lies on its side with its hatch opened at a landing site located in Siziwang Banner in north China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, Thursday, Nov. 17, 2011. The unmanned Chinese spacecraft returned to Earth on Thursday night after it docked twice with an orbiting module in preparation for the country launching its own space station. (AP Photo/Xinhua, Li Gang) NO SALES

China's space program on Friday called the recovery of an unmanned spacecraft that docked twice with an orbiting module a major step toward a future space station, and said it remained open to cooperation with other nations despite U.S. objections.

The 8 craft parachuted to the ground in China's western desert late Thursday after more than two weeks in space. It docked twice with the Tiangong 1 module, which remains in orbit, during a mission proving China capable of successfully docking by remote control. Early U.S. astronauts did so manually.

"It represents a major breakthrough for our country's space rendezvous and docking technology program," said Wang Zhaoyao, deputy director of the China Manned Office.

Although China is developing its space station on its own, Wang said China welcomed outside involvement on the basis of "mutual respect, mutual benefit, transparency and openness."

"We welcome colleagues and experts in the space field to join us in developing and operating this space station so that we can together make greater contributions to and the peaceful use of space," Wang told reporters at a news conference discussing the Shenzhou 8 mission.

China will conduct two more missions next year, one of them possibly manned, and plans to complete a around 2020. At about 60 tons, the Chinese station will be considerably smaller than the 16-nation .

China has made steady progress toward a space station since a 2003 launch that made it only the third nation to put a man in space. Two more have followed, and China separately seeks to launch a next year.

The country launched an independent space station program after being rebuffed in its attempts to join the ISS, largely on objections from the United States. The U.S. is wary of the Chinese program's military links and the sharing of technology with its chief economic and political rival.

Despite that setback, China has refused to rule out future participation in the ISS, a willingness Wang reiterated Friday, and says its craft could dock with the ISS and spacecraft of other nations with only minor adjustments.

Wang said none of the eight Shenzhou missions have had direct military application, but conceded that the space program included many technologies such as communications satellites that could also be utilized by the military. Such so-called dual-use technologies are a common feature of the American and other space programs.

As a major player in science, China needs to independently master space technologies, Wang said, but he added that "independent development does not mean isolated development."

"China stands ready to carry out exchanges and cooperation with other countries in this field," he said.

Already, China has had limited but fruitful engagement in space cooperation with Russia, Germany, France and other nations, Wang said. He said the Shenzhou 8 landing allowed the recovery of 17 biological experiments carried out with Germany in the docking vehicle.

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omatumr
1 / 5 (5) Nov 18, 2011
The U.S. is wary of the Chinese program's military links and the sharing of technology with its chief economic and political rival.


It was my impression that a joint decision of world leaders in ~1971 [1] resulted in:

a.) Dismantling of the US space program, and
b.) Uniting nations against global climate change.

1. "Deep roots of the global climate scandal (1971-2011)"

http://dl.dropbox...oots.pdf

With kind regards,
Oliver K. Manuel
Former NASA Principal
Investigator for Apollo
http://myprofile....anuelo09
jsdarkdestruction
3 / 5 (2) Nov 20, 2011
Oliver Manuel's recent efforts to plaster Physorg.com and other public news sites with his theories and personal URLs are a bit puzzling, as scientists have a variety of publications available to communicate directly to each other in. My best guess is that he is desperately trying to prop up his legacy in light of his arrest in his university office on 7 charges of rape and sodomy based on allegations by 4 of his own children. The charges have been reduced to one count of felony attempted sodomy, not necessarily because of his innocence, but because of the statute of limitations. One can only guess how the recent charges and decades of family strife have affected his ability to reason rationally and to remain objective while defending his unpopular theories.

http://mominer.ms...hildren/

http://www.mshp.d...mp;first