Cassini flyby focuses on Saturn's moon Enceladus

November 8, 2011
NASA's Cassini spacecraft obtained this unprocessed image of Enceladus on Nov. 6, 2011. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

(PhysOrg.com) -- Saturn's moon Enceladus shows its icy face and famous plumes in raw, unprocessed images captured by NASA's Cassini spacecraft during its successful flyby on Nov. 6, 2011.

During this Enceladus encounter, the 16th of Cassini's mission, the spacecraft passed the moon at distance of about 300 miles (500 kilometers) at 10:11 p.m. PDT on Nov. 5 (04:49 UTC on Nov. 6).

To see the raw images, go to saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/photos/raw/ and click on "Search Images."

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the and the Italian Space Agency. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C.

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NickFun
not rated yet Nov 08, 2011
I would like to know -- how is the water on Enceladus being replenished? It's a tiny moon, about the size Of Arizona, yet it spills prodigious amounts of water with no apparent source of replenishment. Assuming this has been going on for even a few thousand years the water should have dried up long ago!

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