Using biochar to boost soil moisture

Nov 08, 2011

Scientists at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) are leading the way in learning more about "biochar," the charred biomass created from wood, other plant material, and manure.

The studies by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists at laboratories across the country support the USDA priorities of promoting international food security and responding to . ARS is USDA's chief intramural scientific research agency.

Soil scientist Jeff Novak at the ARS Coastal Plains Soil, Water and Plant Research Center in Florence, S.C., is coordinating the multi-location effort. In one project, he led a laboratory study to see if different biochars could improve the sandy soils found on the Carolina coastal plain, and Pacific Northwest silt loam soils derived from .

Novak's team used peanut hulls, pecan shells, , switchgrass and hardwood waste products to produce nine different types of biochars. All the feedstocks were pyrolysed at two different temperatures to produce the biochars. Pyrolysis is a process of chemical decomposition that results from rapid heating of the raw feedstocks in the absence of oxygen. Then the biochars were mixed into one type of and two silt loam soils at the rate of about 20 tons per acre.

After four months, the team found that biochars produced from switchgrass and hardwoods increased soil moisture storage in all three soils. They saw the greatest increase in soils amended with switchgrass biochar produced via high-temperature pyrolysis -- almost 3 to 6 percent higher than a control soil sample.

Biochars produced at higher temperatures also increased soil pH levels, and biochar made from poultry litter greatly increased soil levels of available phosphorus and sodium. The scientists also calculated that the switchgrass biochar amendments could extend the window of soil water availability by 1.0 to 3.6 days for a in Florence, and could increase availability for crops grown in Pacific Northwest silt loam soils by 0.4 to 2.5 days.

Given their results, the team believes that agricultural producers could someday select feedstocks and pyrolysis processes to make "designer" biochars with characteristics that target specific deficiencies in soil types.

Explore further: Dead floppy drive: Kenya recycles global e-waste

More information: Results from this study were published in Annals of Environmental Science and in the Journal of Environmental Quality.

Provided by United States Department of Agriculture

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erich_knight
1 / 5 (4) Nov 08, 2011
The thermal conversion of biomass,Beyond Rectifying the Carbon Cycle, Biochar systems integrate nutrient & energy management, serving the same healing function for the Nitrogen and Phosphorous Cycles.

What we can do now with "off the shelf" technology, what I proposed at the Commission for Environmental Cooperation, to the EPA chiefs of North America.
The most cited soil scientist in the world, Dr. Rattan Lal at OSU, was impressed with this talk, commending me on conceptualizing & articulating the concept.

A Report on my talk at CEC, and complete text & links are here:
http://tech.group...age/3233
Titled:
The Establishment of Soil Carbon as the Universal Measure of Sustainability
The photosynthetic "capture" collectors are up and running all around us, the "storage" sink is in operation just under our feet, conversion reactors are the only infrastructure we need to build out. Carbon, as the center of life, has high value to recapitalize our soils
irjsiq
1 / 5 (5) Nov 09, 2011
What are the Ranges of Temperatures for 'Pyrolization' ?
"... pyrolysed at two different temperatures ... "
also: "... switchgrass biochar produced via high-temperature pyrolysis -- "
and relationship of 'biochar' AND 'Tera Preta'?
Interested because of a suspected relationship:
'Pit Barbequing', a Very Ancient method of cooking, and the existence of 'Tera Preta' soils having been 'wrought' via 'Wildfires' in the Amazon Forests, and whether it is likely that Human employment of 'Pit' cooking are 1. related, and 2. that 'Animal Remains' enhanced the 'fertility effects' of Biochar/Tera Pretta Soils!

Currently Researching and're-thinking' methods of 'Pit' types of 'Cooking', and achieving Far Richer Soils! Knowledge of Temperature Ranges of 'Pyrolization' and what are ?Normal? Temperature Ranges of 'Barbeque Pits' during Cooking/Times.

Roy J Stewart,
Phoenix AZ