Artificial molecules: Researchers explore novel methods for assembly of quantum dots

Nov 23, 2011 by Gabriella Chiera
UD's Matthew Doty is co-author of two papers exploring novel methods for assembling quantum dots to control how electrons interact with light and magnetic fields.

(PhysOrg.com) -- Matthew Doty, assistant professor in the University of Delaware Department of Materials Science and Engineering, is co-author of two papers exploring novel methods for assembling quantum dots to control how electrons interact with light and magnetic fields for applications in next generation computing devices and solar energy capture.

The papers recently appeared in Physical Review B, a journal of the American Physical Society (APS). Both papers were selected as “Editor’s Suggestions,” a designation reserved for only five percent of articles submitted to the journal.

Doty’s group studies , tiny semiconductors that can trap single electrons in a manner comparable to atoms like hydrogen and helium. Quantum dots are often referred to as “artificial atoms” because they have electronic properties similar to natural atoms. Doty’s group explores the way these “artificial atoms” can be assembled to create “artificial molecules.” Unlike natural molecules, the properties of these quantum dot molecules can be tailored to create unique and tunable properties for the electrons trapped in the molecules.

The first paper, entitled “In situ tunable g factor for a single electron confined inside an InAs quantum dot molecule,” documents a new strategy for engineering the spin properties of single confined electrons.

Doty’s team demonstrates this strategy by designing, fabricating and characterizing a quantum dot molecule that allows the electron properties to be tuned with a small change in the voltage applied to the molecule. The success of the strategy validates a new approach to engineering optoelectronic devices with dramatically improved computational power.

The lead author of the paper was Weiwen Liu, a doctoral student in Doty’s research group. Co-authors include UD engineering doctoral students Ramsey Hazbun and Shilpa Sanwlani; James Kolodzey, Charles Black Evans Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering; and Allan Bracker and Daniel Gammon from the Naval Research Laboratory.

The second paper, entitled “Spectroscopic signatures of many-body interactions and delocalized states in self-assembled lateral quantum dot molecules,” describes a different molecular design, in which the two quantum dots are placed side by side instead of one on top of the other. The lateral geometry changes the way in which are trapped in the molecule and creates more complex electronic molecular states. These new electronic states of the lateral molecular design provide a template for new computing architectures that overcome scaling limits of conventional charge-based computing by mediating interactions between single confined spins.

Xinran Zhou, a doctoral student in Doty’s research group, served as the lead author of the paper. Co-authors include UD doctoral students Shilpa Sanwlani and Weiwen Liu and researchers from Kwangoon University of South Korea, the University of Arkansas and the University of Electronic Science and Technology of China.

Explore further: Scientists unveil new technology to better understand small clusters of atoms

Related Stories

Could silicon be ideal in quantum computing?

Sep 16, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- "Quantum computing could provide a way to significantly speed up the way we process certain algorithms," Malcolm Carroll tells PhysOrg.com. "The primary issue, though, is that you need a well controlled two-le ...

Good vibrations for future quantum computers

Sep 07, 2011

(PhysOrg.com) -- The enigmatic quantum dot is the basic building block for quantum computers. EPFL physicists have developed a new theory which shows that dot symmetry is enough to account for most of their ...

Recommended for you

Relaxing DNA strands by using nano-channels

18 hours ago

A simple and effective way of unravelling the often tangled mass of DNA is to 'thread' the strand into a nano-channel. A study carried out with the participation of the International School for Advanced Studies ...

Сalculations with nanoscale smart particles

Aug 19, 2014

Researchers from the Institute of General Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences and MIPT have made an important step towards ...

Nanostructure enlightening dendrite-free metal anode

Aug 19, 2014

Graphite anodes have been widely used for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) during the past two decades. The replacement of metallic lithium with graphite enables safe and highly efficient operation of LIBs, however, ...

Bacterial nanowires: Not what we thought they were

Aug 18, 2014

For the past 10 years, scientists have been fascinated by a type of "electric bacteria" that shoots out long tendrils like electric wires, using them to power themselves and transfer electricity to a variety ...

User comments : 5

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

eyeyamtheufo
2 / 5 (1) Nov 23, 2011
They need to be extremely careful, these "things" are already "in the wild". I've experienced them first hand, and continue to experience them at all times. They interact with all forms of electromagnetism, and the electrical grid itself. Oh, and even more concerning, they interact with non-EM fields too, perhaps the mysterious Higgs field itself... whatever *that* is.
Skultch
not rated yet Nov 23, 2011
Really? You've personally "experienced" quantum dots "in the wild?" What do you mean by that, exactly, and I don't believe that you have had any contact with the dots, so do you have any supporting evidence that what you claim is true? Also, have you ever used the alias Pirouette?
Alexander_Wykel
not rated yet Nov 23, 2011
This is a twist on bending modes of moloculs, how does oorginization of orentation differ? Are there charge potentials and linkage responsible for the effect? How does this diffrent from a plasma state of matter which has large charge cominions with little order. Is this an example of gas molocule and liquid florecenct dye?
Code_Warrior
3 / 5 (2) Nov 23, 2011
Really? You've personally "experienced" quantum dots "in the wild?" What do you mean by that, exactly, and I don't believe that you have had any contact with the dots, so do you have any supporting evidence that what you claim is true? Also, have you ever used the alias Pirouette?

Dude, he was totally trippin' on microdots, and he like, got totally confused.
Skultch
not rated yet Nov 24, 2011
The blue dots are the grooooviest, man!!