World needs joint nuclear safety approach

Oct 13, 2011
File photo shows a giant mock nuclear waste barrel in Rome on June 10, 2011. The global upsurge in the use of nuclear power in countries such as China, Russia and Britain must be accompanied by a greater focus on security and the management of nuclear waste, a report said Thursday.

The global upsurge in the use of nuclear power in countries such as China, Russia and Britain must be accompanied by a greater focus on security and the management of nuclear waste, a report said Thursday.

In the wake of the Fukushima disaster, the respected Royal Society called for a World Nuclear Forum that embraces globalisation and overcomes separate national approaches to .

Its report said global regulation for security and non-proliferation "is 50 years out of date and needs to address the changing geography of as well as a fully nationalised ".

"Fukushima has shown that we cannot be complacent about nuclear safety; the same attitude needs to apply to security and non-proliferation," it said.

A global forum would allow business leaders and government chiefs to explore the future development of the nuclear industry, the report added.

The Royal Society said that before the earthquake and tsunami hit Japan in March and caused explosions and leaks at the Fukushima plant, the nuclear industry had foreseen a period of global expansion.

"Post-Fukushima, this may still remain valid, although the rate at which nuclear power expands globally may slow," it said.

Britain's environment minister Chris Huhne gave the green light on Tuesday for the expansion of its nuclear industry after a safety review concluded there was no grounds for Britain to curtail the use of nuclear power.

But the Royal Society accused Britain of operating a "short-sighted" approach to planning and research and urged it to avoid "burdening with a legacy of spent nuclear fuel".

It called for the construction of a new Mox nuclear fuel plant after the closure of Britain's only existing plant at Sellafield in August.

In contrast to Britain, Germany has decided to phase out by 2022 in the wake of the Fukushima disaster.

Explore further: Morocco raises 1.7 bn euros for solar plants

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Japan vows to continue nuclear plant exports

Aug 05, 2011

Japan said Friday it will continue exporting atomic power plants, despite uncertainty over its own use of them as it continues to grapple with a crisis at the tsunami-hit Fukushima nuclear plant.

France to invest 1 bn euros in nuclear power

Jun 27, 2011

France will invest one billion euros ($1.4 billion) in future nuclear power development while boosting research into security, President Nicolas Sarkozy said on Monday.

Recommended for you

The state of shale

16 hours ago

University of Pittsburgh researchers have shared their findings from three studies related to shale gas in a recent special issue of the journal Energy Technology, edited by Götz Veser, the Nickolas A. DeCecco Professor of Che ...

Website shines light on renewable energy resources

Dec 18, 2014

A team from the University of Arizona and eight southwestern electric utility companies have built a pioneering web portal that provides insight into renewable energy sources and how they contribute to the ...

Better software cuts computer energy use

Dec 18, 2014

An EU research project is developing tools to help software engineers create energy-efficient code, which could reduce electricity consumption at data centres by up to 50% and improve battery life in smart ...

Cook farm waste into energy

Dec 17, 2014

It takes some cooking, but turning farm waste into biofuels is now possible and makes economic sense, according to preliminary research from the University of Guelph.

User comments : 3

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

Uzza
not rated yet Oct 13, 2011
The future of nuclear power is using reactor designs that does not produce transuranics, and hampers proliferation.
Molten Salt Reactors running on thorium/U-233 is the only way to solve the problems current water cooled reactors have.
The Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor is the MSR design that needs to be deployed to solve the worlds energy problems.

http://www.youtub...__yYbsZ4
antialias_physorg
not rated yet Oct 13, 2011
The future of nuclear power is using reactor designs that does not produce transuranics, and hampers proliferation.

The future of nuclear power is not using reactors. Period.

(With the possible exceptions of spaceships where you can dump a reactor in a hurry if you need to - if you have a multiply redundant layout that is)
Uzza
not rated yet Oct 13, 2011
The future of nuclear power is not using reactors. Period.

(With the possible exceptions of spaceships where you can dump a reactor in a hurry if you need to - if you have a multiply redundant layout that is)

There is no way for us to power our current society, while at the same time removing all use of fossil fuels, without using nuclear power.

Wind/solar is intermittent, and does not provide baseload power.
If you want to try to use batteries to store the energy it's not just possible: http://www.theoil...ode/8237
Even just building a battery network for the US using the cheapest battery technology available, lead, would need over 50 times more lead than the entire known reserves of the world, and even that would break the US bank.
Now try to scale that for the rest of the world.

Nuclear needs to be a required part of the energy mix if we are to stop the usage of fossil fuels, and LFTR is the only reactor to be able to provide safe and sustainable nuclear power.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.