Toshiba launches image recognition processors for automotive applications

Oct 13, 2011

Toshiba Corporation today announced it will launch the Visconti2 (TMPV7500) series of image recognition processors for automotive applications. Toshiba will start sample shipments of this series in November this year, and mass production in September 2012.

The Visconti2 (TMPV7500) series, the image recognition processors for automotive applications, recognize lanes, vehicles, pedestrians, traffic signs and so on using camera-based vision systems.

The TMPV7506XBG, incorporates Toshiba's original image processing accelerators suitable for human recognition, and is able to detect pedestrians in the daytime in addition to conventional detection of pedestrians at night. Supporting color cameras, the new processor recognizes not only the tone of the target object but also the color, enabling recognition of and signs. As it can connect up to four sets of cameras simultaneously, the TMPV7506XBG is applicable for a bird’s-eye view parking assistance system that uses images synthesized from image data captured by four cameras.

Another line-up within the Visconti2 series is the TMPV7504XBG. Supporting up to two color cameras, the TMPV7504XBG is suitable for a forward monitoring system simultaneously detecting multiple targets, including vehicles, lanes and traffic signs.

Toshiba intends to expand the processor business by enhancing these devices for industrial and consumer applications as well as for automotive applications. The target is to sell 2 million units annually of the total Visconti processors series in fiscal 2015.

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Buyck
not rated yet Oct 15, 2011
Intelligent cars are the future, they will move more and more to human behaviour. The inter(connection) with the car versus human will become closer. Thoughts en feelings of the driver will be heared or captured by the car.