Toshiba 3D glasses-free 55-incher touts especially fine resolution

Oct 06, 2011 by Nancy Owano report
The Regza 55X3.

(PhysOrg.com) -- A 3-D television that needs no special glasses? Been there. A television with supersized screen? Yesterday's news. Toshiba, on the other hand, this week announced its 55-inch Regza 55x3 LCD television that carries 2-D content that stands out in its "ultra" high display resolution, along with its 3-D capabilities that are glasses-free.

The new Regza, placed on view at Japan’s CEATEC Japan 2011, can display 3,840 x 2,160-pixel 2-D video along with glasses-free 3-D but the latter is at a lower resolution.

Toshiba's new model is in the league of what is called "Quad Full High Definition (QFHD) technology, at 3840 x 2160 pixels.

As for the 3-D feature, played in “naked eye” 3-D, without the aid of special glasses, the 3-D is at a lower resolution.

Reviewers say that the 3-D display is still impressive. The new TV has a face-tracking application to make sure the 3-D viewing experience is optimized for all viewers at multiple seating locations.

Release of the 55-inch Regza 55x3 is set for mid-December in . Pricing will be $11,730.

Toshiba plans to manufacture 1,000 units per month.

Toshiba Corporate Senior Vice President, Masaaki Oosumi said that they are targeting initial monthly sales of 1,000 units but expect a lift in that number once the product goes overseas. There were no details provided on when the TV would be offered overseas and where.

The price tag is one that mass market consumers would consider either impossible or absurd. Nonetheless, Toshiba knows its market and consumer interests.

Masaaki Osumi, Toshiba's executive officer, corporate senior vice president and president and CEO of Digital Products & Services Company of Toshiba, said “We want to realize video of [sic] dreams."

Toshiba sees the gold in making sets that carry superior high resolution, period. “When you keep improving the , what you see will eventually become almost similar to real-life 3-D images,” said Taro Hiyama, chief marketing executive for ’s digital products and services unit, according to The Wall Street Journal. That level of high-definition may become possible in four to five years, he said.

The 3-D application is powered by CEVO-ENGINE Duo, which is the company’s high-performance multi-processor platform.

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User comments : 9

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baudrunner
not rated yet Oct 06, 2011
When I saw my first LCD TV by Sharp, at my brother-in-law's about ten years ago, I was so impressed by the quality (it was a $4,000 set) that I remarked that the picture delivered by the blue ray player on that set was clearer than real. That's not so ridiculous. Because of the backlighting, that is the actual effect, because there is no backlighting in reality. 3840 x 2160? That'll blow me away.
CHollman82
2.3 / 5 (3) Oct 06, 2011
That's great and all but it doesn't matter what the resolution of the TV is if you can't get source material in that resolution... Good luck getting a copy of a movie at 3840x2160 native...
DHowitzer
5 / 5 (2) Oct 06, 2011
That's great and all but it doesn't matter what the resolution of the TV is if you can't get source material in that resolution... Good luck getting a copy of a movie at 3840x2160 native...


4K resolution movies are higher than even QuadHD... plenty content is available already, even on youtube.. search "4k resolution". Some of it is eyewateringly vivid, even on "normal" 30in monitor.
CHollman82
3 / 5 (2) Oct 06, 2011
That's great and all but it doesn't matter what the resolution of the TV is if you can't get source material in that resolution... Good luck getting a copy of a movie at 3840x2160 native...


4K resolution movies are higher than even QuadHD... plenty content is available already, even on youtube.. search "4k resolution". Some of it is eyewateringly vivid, even on "normal" 30in monitor.


Are you nuts? The "content" that you're referring to is demonstration videos. Show me where I can buy actual movies at 4k...

FYI I have a 32gb uncompressed bluray rip of the movie 300 at 1920x1080 and my quad core phenom II at 3.2ghz struggles to play it
MachinegunDojo
not rated yet Oct 06, 2011
If there's nothing that will display higher than 1080p, then why make any source material higher than 1080p? If there's no source material higher than 1080p, then why make a display higher than 1080p? hrm, there's a problem here and it involves starting somewhere.
CHollman82
1 / 5 (1) Oct 06, 2011
If there's nothing that will display higher than 1080p, then why make any source material higher than 1080p? If there's no source material higher than 1080p, then why make a display higher than 1080p? hrm, there's a problem here and it involves starting somewhere.


True enough. I was only considering my personal benefit... I am not an early adopter. I am glad some people are foolish enough to be or, as you alluded to, progress would be stifled.
nanotech_republika_pl
not rated yet Oct 06, 2011
Impressive technology but as yet not very useful, maybe for plug in a computer and using the monitor as a display.

But even if there was a TV that could deliver at that resolution, then the screen size, 55 inch, is too small to notice the resolution. For example, I have a 42" HDTV and I have to stand about 2-3 feet away from it to really get the full resolution, that is to start seeing grain (pixels). With this resolution 2 or 3 times as typical HDTV, you have to have your head about 1-2 feet away. Nothing close to what they show in that demo where the camera is able to detect the viewer head location.

Plus I came to the conclusion that HDTV is only good for watching sports, where you want to observe the ball and sportsmen very closely. Movies are like stories, the resolution of the picture is secondary to the story line. I watch Avatar in 3D, I saw no point of it in 3D.
Nuffigus
5 / 5 (1) Oct 07, 2011
That's great and all but it doesn't matter what the resolution of the TV is if you can't get source material in that resolution... Good luck getting a copy of a movie at 3840x2160 native...


I wonder if that was said about 1080p at some point.

Hmmmm
RealScience
not rated yet Oct 07, 2011
There's plenty of 2D still content of that resolution - an 8 megapixel camera is far from leading edge.
And what I want one for is a computer screen - that's twice the pixels of my main monitor, and 25% more than my two monitors together. But the price has to drop ~5x first.