Students plot experiments for YouTube Space Lab

Oct 10, 2011
NASA image released in June 2011 shows the International Space Station and the docked space shuttle Endeavour. Teenagers around the world on Monday were invited to design experiments that will be conducted on the International Space Station and streamed for all to see on YouTube.

Teenagers around the world on Monday were invited to design experiments that will be conducted on the International Space Station and streamed for all to see on YouTube.

The Google-owned video-sharing website and Chinese computer titan Lenovo worked with US, European, and Japanese agencies to launch YouTube Space Lab as a way to ignite passions for .

" was founded by scientists, so inspiring the next generation of scientists is very important to us," said Zahaan Bharmal, the California Internet firm's head of marketing for Europe, Africa, and the Middle East.

It was Bharmal's idea to have students think of cool experiments to try in the micro-gravity environment on the Space Station and then arrange for the most promising concepts to be tested there.

"We are taking the two best experiments, packing them on a rocket and sending them to the ," Bharmal told AFP.

"We are hoping that the live stream on YouTube will be the world's largest, coolest classroom," he continued.

The panel judging entries includes renowned physicist and Stephen Hawking. Experiments should fall into the broad categories of physics or biology.

The YouTube Space Lab competition is open to students from 14 to 18 years of age.

Winning experiments will be sent some time next year to the space station on a Japanese rocket, conducted using Lenovo computers, and streamed live on YouTube with held from NASA, according to Bharmal.

Students whose ideas are selected will get to chose between being at the or a visit to the cosmonaut training facility in Russia.

The window for pitching ideas closes on December 7, and winners will be announced in Washington, D.C., in March.

The six regional winners will be treated to zero-gravity flights jokingly referred to as the "vomit comet" for the outcome it is prone to evoke, according to Bharmal.

"It makes me wish I was still a teenager," said Bharmal, who embraced science in his school days and even studied physics at the University of Oxford in Britain.

The Space Lab channel at YouTube could become a permanent online venue for science related content.

Information about the contest was available online at .com/user/spacelab .

Explore further: Why is Venus so horrible?

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Endeavour astronauts to take YouTube questions

Apr 27, 2011

YouTube on Wednesday invited users to submit questions for the crew of the US space shuttle Endeavour, which blasts off on Friday on its final mission to the International Space Station.

YouTube adds stage for live events

Apr 08, 2011

YouTube on Friday added a stage for live events as the world's leading video-sharing website continued its effort to woo viewers away from television programming.

72 million live YouTube streams for royal wedding

May 06, 2011

The wedding of Prince William to Kate Middleton attracted 72 million live streams on YouTube in 188 countries and over 100 million views on the big day itself, the Google-owned video-sharing site said Friday.

Russia to launch orbital laboratories

Aug 14, 2006

Russian space officials say they will launch two orbital laboratories to conduct experiments involving zero gravity, materials in space and biotechnologies.

Recommended for you

SDO captures images of two mid-level flares

18 hours ago

The sun emitted a mid-level flare on Dec. 18, 2014, at 4:58 p.m. EST. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which watches the sun constantly, captured an image of the event. Solar flares are powerful bursts ...

Why is Venus so horrible?

Dec 19, 2014

Venus sucks. Seriously, it's the worst. The global temperature is as hot as an oven, the atmospheric pressure is 90 times Earth, and it rains sulfuric acid. Every part of the surface of Venus would kill you ...

Image: Christmas wrapping the Sentinel-3A antenna

Dec 19, 2014

The moment a team of technicians, gowned like hospital surgeons, wraps the Sentinel-3A radar altimeter in multilayer insulation to protect it from the temperature extremes found in Earth orbit.

Video: Flying over Becquerel

Dec 19, 2014

This latest release from the camera on ESA's Mars Express is a simulated flight over the Becquerel crater, showing large-scale deposits of sedimentary material.

Spinning up a dust devil on Mars

Dec 19, 2014

Spinning up a dust devil in the thin air of Mars requires a stronger updraft than is needed to create a similar vortex on Earth, according to research at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH).

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.