RIM rallies developers to burnish BlackBerry

October 17, 2011
Mike Lazaridis, founder and co-chief executive of Research In Motion (RIM) speaks at a news conference in New York City in 2010. Research In Motion (RIM) kicks off a major software developers conference Tuesday as the BlackBerry maker tries to burnish its tarnished image and stop losing ground to rivals.

Research In Motion (RIM) kicks off a major software developers conference Tuesday as the BlackBerry maker tries to burnish its tarnished image and stop losing ground to rivals.

Training sessions for "app" creators were being held on the eve of an annual DevCon Americas gathering that will run through Thursday in downtown San Francisco.

Canada-based RIM packed the conference with sessions, panels, and seminars focused on building hip, fun, or functional mini-programs for BlackBerry smartphones and the company's PlayBook .

RIM co-chief Mike Lazaridis opens the conference early Tuesday with "mobile partners and passionate enthusiasts" who will help showcase the BlackBerry platform and "what's in store" for developers.

Along with applications for taking care of business, RIM plans sessions on making games for BlackBerry and PlayBook devices to go up against iPhones, , and Android gadgets in an increasingly consumer-driven market.

Apps have become vital to the popularity of smartphones and tablets as people increasingly rely on mobile devices for conveniences such as tracking jogging routes, posting updates to Facebook, or playing games like Angry Birds.

RIM stock price dropped more than six percent to $22.43 a share on the Nasdaq exchange on Monday after the company offered customers free apps to make amends for outages last week that bedeviled millions of users worldwide.

RIM said customers would be able to download for free a selection of its premium applications "worth a total value of more than $100" including games, hands-free operating programs and other tools "as an expression of appreciation."

Users will have until the end of the year to avail themselves of the offer.

RIM's network services for BlackBerry mobile phones were down intermittently for up to three days last week in , the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and North and South America.

RIM blamed the failure of a "core switch" at a facility in Europe as well as a backup mechanism for the initial problem, knocking out emails and messaging for users.

RIM has some 70 million BlackBerry subscribers worldwide, with many companies and governments depending on their networks and phones for internal communications.

The company has faced challenges from other aggressive smartphone makers, especially Apple's iPhone, though RIM's security-tight networks still remain preferred by businesses.

Explore further: Blackberry buddies up to game developers

Related Stories

Blackberry buddies up to game developers

November 9, 2009

Research In Motion (RIM) on Monday announced it is making Blackberry devices friendlier to game applications, as the business-oriented smartphones try to show a more playful side.

RIM recalling 1,000 PlayBook tablets

May 16, 2011

Blackberry maker Research In Motion (RIM) said Monday it is recalling around 1,000 PlayBook tablet computers because of an operating system issue.

Recommended for you

Smart home heating and cooling

August 28, 2015

Smart temperature-control devices—such as thermostats that learn and adjust to pre-programmed temperatures—are poised to increase comfort and save energy in homes.

Smallest 3-D camera offers brain surgery innovation

August 28, 2015

To operate on the brain, doctors need to see fine details on a small scale. A tiny camera that could produce 3-D images from inside the brain would help surgeons see more intricacies of the tissue they are handling and lead ...

Team creates functional ultrathin solar cells

August 27, 2015

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with Johannes Kepler University Linz in Austria has developed an ultrathin solar cell for use in lightweight and flexible applications. In their paper published in the journal Nature Materials, ...

Interactive tool lifts veil on the cost of nuclear energy

August 24, 2015

Despite the ever-changing landscape of energy economics, subject to the influence of new technologies and geopolitics, a new tool promises to root discussions about the cost of nuclear energy in hard evidence rather than ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.