US protestors find allies in app makers

Oct 28, 2011
US street protestors have won allies in software makers who have crafted programs that let smartphones fire off word of imminent arrest or let rallying cries be heard by crowds.

US street protestors have won allies in software makers who have crafted programs that let smartphones fire off word of imminent arrest or let rallying cries be heard by crowds.

A free "I'm Being Arrested" application was available on Thursday at the online Market stocked with programs for smartphones powered by the Google-backed software.

"Alert your lawyer, loved ones, etc. that you are being arrested with a click," said a description of the mini-program for activists taking part in the Occupy Wall Street protests which have spread to other US cities.

The Arrested application lets users make lists of people to be notified with text messages in event of impending , and then fires off a batch of missives with the press of a target-shaped on-screen icon.

A movements.org website on Thursday had posted instructions for getting, installing and using the application, including recommending people chock messages with details about who is demonstrating and where.

Feedback at the Android Market included urging the application be modified to include location information automatically by tapping into capabilities of smartphones.

"The people have had enough," one reviewer wrote in a chat forum at the Android Market.

"Monster.com makes an app to help you look for a job," countered another reviewer. "How about downloading that one instead!"

The Arrested application was available in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Turkish, and Catalan.

Protestors have also tapped into Vibe software that lets people using Apple or Android smartphones anonymously exchange short text messages that can be set to automatically delete a short time later.

The thinking is that vanished messages can't be seen by authorities that may get hold of activists' smartphones.

A Shouty app for Android devices lets protestors broadcast speeches to other smartphones in crowds, avoiding police bans on or megaphones.

Applications for Android can be unleashed faster because they don't undergo the strict vetting process Apple uses to evaluate smartphone programs.

Software savants have taken to brainstorming on Occupy-friendly smartphone applications during "hackathons," with projects including software tracking reports of police brutality and tutorials for activists.

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Nerdyguy
2 / 5 (4) Oct 28, 2011
"US street protestors have won allies in software makers who have crafted programs that let smartphones fire off word of imminent arrest or let rallying cries be heard by crowds."

These poor, poor, out-of-work, 60s-era throwbacks demonstrating because they are unemployed and need jobs can AFFORD to pay for smartphones and the contracts to use them?
jakack
2.3 / 5 (3) Oct 31, 2011
You know in the back of all these trouble-making OWS types that they are WISHING & HOPING for a police officer to step over the boundaries. They are just itching to scream "police brutality". The development of this app for these people proves it even more.

I praise the police for doing as good of a job as they are doing, remaining calm, enforcing the laws, and maintaining order for the rest of us out here that despise those who think they represent anyone else but themselves with these antics.
kaasinees
0 / 5 (21) Oct 31, 2011
praise the police for doing as good of a job as they are doing, remaining calm, enforcing the laws, and maintaining order

Violating rights is now part of enforcing laws? Oxymoron?

These poor, poor, out-of-work, 60s-era throwbacks demonstrating because they are unemployed and need jobs can


Not all of them are without jobs.
jakack
1 / 5 (1) Oct 31, 2011
Violating rights is now part of enforcing laws? Oxymoron?


How have the police violated rights?
kaasinees
0 / 5 (21) Oct 31, 2011
Violating rights is now part of enforcing laws? Oxymoron?


How have the police violated rights?

1. They did not state rights when making arrests.
2. They tied up a girl on a street.
3. I saw a cop beat up a citizen at a protest.
4. They used teargas at protests which can cause cancer and are cardiogenic.
5. They used fences to contain people.
6. Most of these cops are not on duty.
7. They used stun grenades TOO CLOSE to the citizens then prescribed. (Right on top of them actually)
8. These tools can be deadly.

All of these are violations of rights, and this is just what i saw from videos.
Nerdyguy
3 / 5 (2) Oct 31, 2011
You know in the back of all these trouble-making OWS types that they are WISHING & HOPING for a police officer to step over the boundaries. They are just itching to scream "police brutality". The development of this app for these people proves it even more.

I praise the police for doing as good of a job as they are doing, remaining calm, enforcing the laws, and maintaining order for the rest of us out here that despise those who think they represent anyone else but themselves with these antics.


Agreed. This could be (and still might) much more ugly.
kaasinees
0 / 5 (21) Oct 31, 2011
jakack
3 / 5 (2) Oct 31, 2011
As I don't know the context of all these accusations of the police, I can't speak to defend or criticize their actions. If those people believe that they were dealt undue harm by an officer they have the right to file in court.

A police officer is human and can make mistakes. However, even with that said, I'd put 95% of my money with the police force in that they made the best decision given the situation.
Nerdyguy
1 / 5 (2) Oct 31, 2011
@kaasinees, please see my comments below:

1. They did not state rights when making arrests.
NERD: You can't know this. They can Mirandize you along the walk to the car, etc.

2. They tied up a girl on a street.
NERD: Standard procedure at times. Only so many cuffs to go around.

3. I saw a cop beat up a citizen at a protest.
NERD: requires proof. Sometimes standard.

4. They used teargas at protests which can cause cancer and are cardiogenic.
NERD: LMAO! Cry me a river (no pun intended). Standard procedure.

5. They used fences to contain people.
NERD: Standard.

6. Most of these cops are not on duty.
NERD: LOL! You have NO WAY of knowing this.

7. They used stun grenades TOO CLOSE to the citizens then prescribed.
NERD: Standard police procedure.

8. These tools can be deadly.
NERD: Yep. So?

All of these are violations of rights, and this is just what i saw from videos.

NERD: Wrong. Wrong. Wrong. Wrong. Well, I'm out of room.
Nerdyguy
1 / 5 (2) Oct 31, 2011
@kaasinees: it is clear from the above analysis that you do not understand the rights of U.S. Citizens. If I may ask, are you an American?
jakack
3 / 5 (2) Oct 31, 2011
I would venture to guess that those incarcerated or pepper-sprayed were either ignoring or ignorant of the laws and/or intentionally disobeying a police officer (which is also breaking the law). In America, as soon as you break the law, you have forfeited some rights while of course retaining your miranda rights.

@kaasinees -You exemplify exactly what I was speaking about above. Pick out an incident and LOUDLY PROCLAIM that RIGHTS HAVE BEEN TRAMPLED then let the media run its course of "reporting" and allowing the lies/distortion of truth to promulgate to the rest of the population. All with the hopes that they win over the hearts of those who neglect to process the entirety of the situation.
kaasinees
0 / 5 (21) Oct 31, 2011
NERD: Standard procedure at times. Only so many cuffs to go around.

nonsense, no cop has the right to do this without reason.
the bystanders were calling their amendments and the cops were forced to remove the cuffs.
NERD: requires proof. Sometimes standard.

No cop has the right to beat you up whatever the situation is. They get training to disable people, their hands are considered weapons in court.
NERD: LMAO! Cry me a river (no pun intended). Standard procedure.

So its ok to use banned weapons in war on citizens?
NERD: Standard.

Standard violations of rights, nobody has the right to detain anyone without arrest.
NERD: Standard police procedure.

No, the standard police procedure is to follow the guidelines that they are told to and even this is a violation of rights.
NERD: Yep. So?

Its called man-slaughter in court.
NERD: Wrong. Wrong. Wrong. Wrong. Well, I'm out of room.


You are just a little baby aren't you?
Nerdyguy
1 / 5 (1) Oct 31, 2011
@kaasinees, don't just rank it as a 1. Give me some meaningful feedback.
Nerdyguy
3 / 5 (2) Oct 31, 2011
@kaasinees,

Your response, rather than being the reasonable discourse I had hoped for, was an incredibly simplistic rant that amounted to "nanny-nanny-boo-boo". Come on, you can do better. These are serious issues, and you have simply stated what amounts to a "hopeful wish". And the silly nonsense like "manslaughter". Geez.

The fact is, every single item you mentioned, including getting "beaten up" is an actual standard police procedure. The fact that you do not understand this and clearly do not understand your own rights, tells me that you are part of the problem, rather than the solution.

I would recommend taking the time to educate yourself in these matters. In the short run, it could enlighten you and will likely (I'm guessing) give you even more reason to be angry once you understand that I'm 100% legally correct. In the long run, it may save you from a few bruises and from spending the night in jail. Or not.
Nerdyguy
1 / 5 (1) Oct 31, 2011
@kaasinees,

One other point. You may want to consider that not everything you see on YouTube is factually correct. Just saying.